308 Masculin féminin

Discuss DVDs and Blu-rays released by Criterion and the films on them. If it's got a spine number, it's in here. Threads may contain spoilers.
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therewillbeblus
Joined: Tue Dec 22, 2015 3:40 pm

Re: 308 Masculin féminin

#126 Post by therewillbeblus » Fri Jan 15, 2021 7:53 pm

Scorseez wrote:
Fri Jan 15, 2021 4:07 pm
I'm really going to hesitate buying any future standalone releases from Godard, Kurosawa, Antonioni, etc. It seems like box sets could conceivably be in the works for all major/deceased "Criterion-heavy" directors.
Maybe, but this is one of Godard's very best films and to hold out for who-knows-how-long-if-ever just based on a hunch seems like some unnecessary self-deprivation to save $20 down the line. Plus if sales help will such a box into existence, why not contribute?

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therewillbeblus
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Re: 308 Masculin féminin

#127 Post by therewillbeblus » Fri Jan 15, 2021 8:04 pm

domino harvey wrote:
Fri Jan 15, 2021 12:32 pm
Adrian Martin's superb commentary from the Australian disc
I'm struggling to find a copy online, is the Madman release OOP (or if not, any idea where I might find it)? The only DVD option I'm seeing outside the Crit is a Korean disc

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domino harvey
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Re: 308 Masculin féminin

#128 Post by domino harvey » Fri Jan 15, 2021 9:50 pm

Based on the disc up on DaaVeeDee, it looks like Umbrella recently released a barebones version in Australia. The one with Martin's commentary was def Madman in their Director's Suite (here's a review with an image of the cover). I bought it many moons ago direct from Madman, so I'm afraid I can't help with tracking it down

EDIT It looks like just about EVERY Madman Director's Suite DVD is OOP now

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therewillbeblus
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Re: 308 Masculin féminin

#129 Post by therewillbeblus » Fri Jan 15, 2021 9:55 pm

Bummer, thanks for the confirmation though. Unfortunately the commentary isn't up on backchannels either- WTF Criterion

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Fred Holywell
Joined: Thu Jun 10, 2010 11:45 pm

Re: 308 Masculin féminin

#130 Post by Fred Holywell » Fri Jan 15, 2021 10:24 pm

Unfortunately, it's not the commentary, but there's a 12 minute video essay by Adrian Martin (& Cristina Álvarez López) on the film's queer subtext on Vimeo. And there's a detailed review of the film on Martin's website.

Scorseez
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Re: 308 Masculin féminin

#131 Post by Scorseez » Fri Jan 15, 2021 11:46 pm

therewillbeblus wrote:
Fri Jan 15, 2021 7:53 pm
Scorseez wrote:
Fri Jan 15, 2021 4:07 pm
I'm really going to hesitate buying any future standalone releases from Godard, Kurosawa, Antonioni, etc. It seems like box sets could conceivably be in the works for all major/deceased "Criterion-heavy" directors.
Maybe, but this is one of Godard's very best films and to hold out for who-knows-how-long-if-ever just based on a hunch seems like some unnecessary self-deprivation to save $20 down the line. Plus if sales help will such a box into existence, why not contribute?
Fair point. This has no basis in fact but I’m thinking that the subsidization of box sets and Criterion’s profitability in general is transitioning more towards high profile releases, particularly the new Netflix licensing deals, than older art house titles like Godard. So I’ll hold tight for now.

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ianthemovie
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Re: 308 Masculin féminin

#132 Post by ianthemovie » Sat Jan 16, 2021 12:50 pm

colinr0380 wrote:
Tue Mar 25, 2014 3:10 pm
This also feels like the key intermediate Jean-Pierre Léaud role - the 'teenage' role coming between the 'childhood' of 400 Blows and the 'adulthood' of The Mother And The Whore.
Now we just need a decent release of The Mother and the Whore.

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therewillbeblus
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Re: 308 Masculin féminin

#133 Post by therewillbeblus » Sat Jan 16, 2021 2:41 pm

Over the last five years or so I've watched this film about once a year, and even though it's always been a top-five Godard I become more and more confident that this is Godard's greatest film in a world where Pierrot le Fou doesn't exist. So why don't I say it's his second greatest film? Because while Pierrot le Fou is a culmination of every tone, idea, emotion, genre, [insert anything that comes to mind that can possibly be expressed] exploding onto the screen with heightened passion, Masculin féminin feels like a more introverted implosion that uses similar intensity to reflect a place more desolate and confounding within the swamp of both specific and timeless socio-cultural stimuli. It's like a funhouse-mirrored part B appendix with so much information it becomes a spiritual sequel of matched scope. I wish could share the spotlight as my other all-time favorite film, as it communicates all of the vast lingering philosophical and psychological experiences that the previous film, and I, didn't know were leftover through another milieu-made-playground for biopsychosocialspiritual projections.

Godard emulates the challenges inherent in navigating sexual politics and self-knowledge with any intimacy or dependable insight through surreal and dense expositions on saturating world politics and unpredictable human behavior, a familiar eclectic disorderly narrative and technical choices, and attitudes equal parts apathetic and fervent, but with no reciprocal space for the sought catharsis. The film is a stylistically-propelled disturbance by design, an artistic emesis of confusion, surrender, and will. Adrian Martin's essay says all this and more better than I ever could, but I think one aspect of both this film (and Pierrot) that he gets so right is how Godard is simultaneously judging his characters from an aloof position and also deeply empathizing with them. Martin also makes a point to note that this is the last Godard film to "employ a relatively conventional model of character psychology," and it's a testament to his genius that he was able to say and purge so much more through these methods of devastating vivacity following a transitional period post-Karina and Pierrot. Godard’s uses his extra life to double down and profess a second existential crisis captured on celluloid from a new vantage point, with the playful spirit of a man eagerly hanging on to life, for one last chance to provide a commentary with the methodology of surrogate characterization.

I'm also more convinced than ever that Goya's facial expression on the cover is perfectly suitable for the material, because the film makes a point to show and tell how it's the most raw, simple, physical exhibition of Godard's visionary worldview of ubiquitous contradictions. Her smile is both meaningful and meaningless, authentic and false, showing an impulsive truth and shielding a deeper sincerity from herself and others under a lie. In the final scene, which is anything but happy, Goya also smiles nervously- which is from where this cover photo is taken. When she answers "I don't know" the first time we sense it's a more honest and self-assured response- but only assured under the falsehood of the calm stoicism we hide behind to avoid digging deeper to confront uncomfortable questions. She takes a moment to actually pierce through this layer and her face moves between a half-smile and half-frown, as she mentally enters a purgatory of fear, disorientation, hopelessness, impassioned drive, intent for identity conservation and a paradoxical realization of the implicit barriers preventing her from accessing any identity to formulate, let alone conserve. The second "I don't know" is as brutal and real as any moment in any Godard film, a definitive ironic and earnest demonstration of Lacan's Real stripped down, and evokes pain and promise and everything in between in one of the greatest moments in cinema history. Per usual, I've only regurgitated some convoluted thoughts about one of my favorite films that can't be described- but since that's what the film is essentially broadcasting to me, it feels appropriate. So what else could the cover possibly be, to transmit this film's ineffable feeling?

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Rayon Vert
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Re: 308 Masculin féminin

#134 Post by Rayon Vert » Sat Jan 16, 2021 4:07 pm

My #1 and 2 are the same as yours TW, so I'm very happy about this upgrade.

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