The Films of 2017

Discussions of specific films and franchises.
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knives
Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2008 6:49 pm

Re: The Films of 2017

#76 Post by knives » Sun Jul 22, 2018 2:10 pm

In the Fade feels like a movie that Atom Egoyan could have at least made pretty compelling, but in Fatih Akin's hands it moves to elevate trash cinema grammar, but only rises it to slightly agreeable blandness which isn't what I want out of my neo-Nazi bombing movie. Diane Kruger is about as good as could be expected with the material without really going so far as to explain her Cannes win. In particular there's one scene with a bath tub that better directing and acting might have made something out of, but as is it plays as comedy beyond the simple irony it is introducing.

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flyonthewall2983
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Re: The Films of 2017

#77 Post by flyonthewall2983 » Tue Dec 11, 2018 1:56 pm

Lowlife is a twisty, darkly comic tragedy in the non-linear mold of early Tarantino, with present implications to the darker side of the American experience. With sometimes horrific results, it somehow doesn't plunge itself entirely in nihilism either. It's Ryan Prows' debut feature, and a very promising one at that.

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flyonthewall2983
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Re: The Films of 2017

#78 Post by flyonthewall2983 » Sun Dec 16, 2018 11:36 am

Racer And The Jailbird isn't quite the follow-up to Michaël R. Roskam's two excellent previous features that I hoped it would be, but not for lack of emotion. Matthias Schoenarts (who I thought was brilliant in both of those movies, in almost contrasting roles in both Bullhead and The Drop) and Adèle Exarchopoulos certainly don't phone in their chemistry, but I felt like the story lost steam towards the end.

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Michael Kerpan
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Re: The Films of 2017

#79 Post by Michael Kerpan » Mon Jun 24, 2019 10:40 pm

The Day After (HONG Sang-soo)

I initially saw this screened quite a while ago (Harvard Film Archive, maybe), and finally got to re-watch it via the Cinema Guild Blu Ray. Structurally this seemed rather different -- a fair amount of cross-cutting between different time lines (sometimes flashbacks, perhaps, sometimes not). KIM Min-hee is (as is usually the case now) the lead actress -- and she is quite fine here (as is also routinely the case). The rest of the cast is quite good for their roles as well. Lots of talking, a comparatively modest amount of drinking (and no vomiting). Kim's character has the misfortune of starting a new job (for an author/publisher) on the same day her boss's wife decides to confront her husband's (former) secretary/mistress. I found this consistently engaging -- and occasionally funny. If one likes Hong's films at all, this is really very much worth seeing.

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flyonthewall2983
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Re: The Films of 2017

#80 Post by flyonthewall2983 » Mon Jul 22, 2019 1:57 pm

I quite enjoyed Tom Of Finland, dramatically speaking but also getting a clearer understanding of where some of my own prurience comes from (adoring both men and women in leather as it were). It is also about connections and disconnections, romantically, sexually and culturally speaking.

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Red Screamer
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Re: The Films of 2017

#81 Post by Red Screamer » Fri Sep 06, 2019 12:27 pm

Leigh Ledare's documentary The Task, one of the most infuriating and exhilarating contemporary films, is available to watch for free on Vimeo (password on his linked website). Description:
Ledare filmed The Task during a three-day Group Relations Conference—a socialpsychology method developed by London’s Tavistock Institute—that the artist organized in Chicago. In addition to directing the film crew, Ledare assembled the 28 participants and secured the collaboration of 10 psychologists trained in the method. During a sequence of small and large group meetings, the group studies its own self-made social structure—an abstract “task” that allows participants to examine the identities, roles, desires, and biases individuals import into the group, as well as conscious and unconscious group dynamics. Ledare introduces one key modification, however: the presence of a camera crew and the artist as observers and collaborators. This intervention shifts the “here and now” orientation of the conference by making the members of the group aware of the effect of external social and technological forces. By complicating authority and boundaries among all members—including the artist—Ledare calls attention, by analogy, to power structures that govern our relations to one another in a society where we are increasingly both observers and observed.
Ledare captures some of the greatest documentary close-ups here and the way he follows personal and group dynamics through behavioral changes, both obvious and subtle, is fascinating.

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