Avant-Garde, Experimental & Non-narrative Films

A subforum to discuss film culture and criticism both old and new, as well as memorializing public figures we've lost.
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Cold Bishop
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 9:45 pm
Location: Portland, OR

#126 Post by Cold Bishop » Sat Jan 20, 2007 4:09 pm

Carsten Czarnecki wrote:Does anyone know a program with which one can transform .avi files into .vob files, that is DVDs? Because that way one could make DVD-Rs out of the .avi files from UBU WEB.
I would always recommend VideoHelp.com which has lots of information on these kinds of things.

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Gregory
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 4:07 pm

#127 Post by Gregory » Sat Jan 20, 2007 5:37 pm

sevenarts wrote:Has anyone bought any dvds from re:voir?
This announcement by Pip Chodorov from last year may be of interest to some:
We have successfully avoided DVD for the past 8 years. Now we are having trouble avoiding, but we are only planning to release on DVD films composed of natural and predictable movements: the Zanzibar films, David Perlov's Diary, Steve Dwoskin's Dyn Amo, Adolfas Mekas's Hallelujah the Hills, Isidore Isou's Traité de Bave et d'éternité, portraits of filmmakers... As soon as we can feasibly produce and distribute Blu-Ray discs we will start converting our complete VHS line to disc.

I guess they're going with Blu-Ray rather than HD-DVD for the slight technical superiority, but this seems a shame because from what little I know things aren't looking very good for Blu-Ray's potential to get a real foothold as a format. Nonetheless, these planned releases from Re:Voir, especially of Harry Smith films, will be enough to persuade me to get a Blu-Ray player if/when they come down enough in price.

Zillertal
Joined: Thu Jan 18, 2007 9:48 am

#128 Post by Zillertal » Wed Jan 24, 2007 9:21 am

hi!

Finally I was able register in this fine forum.

I've purchased a lot of things from re:voir and they have a fast and reliable service.

They have released so far on DVD a DVD portrait of Stéphane Marti, Jackie Reynal 'Deux Fois' and Garrel's Le révélateur. I have both editions of Révélateur, and this one is by far superior, the contrast is completely different and gives the film a much more somber tone.

They are planning to release shortly, Garrel's Le lit de La Vierge, and also the following:

David perlov Diary
Gunvor Nelson
isidore Isou Traité de bave et d'éternité
Dwoskin's Dyn Amo
Guy Sherwin's Short films Series
Some other films by Patrick Bokanowski

And a few things more, most of these will be on DVD, Pip Chodorov will also release this year their first blu-ray editions of Brakhage, Mekas and Kenneth Anger. All of their DVDs include english subtitles.

Le Mouvement des Images, includes several wonderfull films, including Rose Hobart with a different tinting, a rose one, that gives the film a little more of a sexier tone. And also is Gnir Rednow the twin work to Brakhage's Wonder Ring.

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sevenarts
Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 7:22 pm
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#129 Post by sevenarts » Wed Jan 24, 2007 10:28 am

I wanted to post about the films of Paolo Gioli, since I just received the Raro double-disc set last night and had an opportunity to watch a handful of the films. This is AMAZING stuff, and it's really a shame that he seems to be so obscure -- even by experimental film standards -- outside of his native country. These films grapple with the very nature of film itself, subverting its norms to an extent that I haven't seen in any other filmmaker. A large theme in this work is the concept of framing, and permutations on this idea are played out in virtually any way conceivable. The black leader between film frames is exposed and played with in Gioli's films, with decentralize the image itself so that the frame is often dominated by the physical presence of the film rather than the image contained on the film. It's not just that the film jitters around to reveal the black space around the image, but that often Gioli actually shows a filmstrip progressing in front of the camera, or allows the screen to be completely dominated by totally abstract compositions.

Gioli also plays with the frame in the sense that he's constantly dividing and subdividing the screen rather than simply presenting a single image. In Secondo il mio occhio di vetro, a crude split screen displays two faces, one in negative of the other, progressing through an impressively broad range of human emotional expression at a very rapid rate -- apparently accomplished with a dizzying mix of stop-motion, sped-up photography, and superimpositions. Gioli then further divides the screen into sub-frames by pasting in more superimpositions on top of the split divide. It's incredibly complex and visually almost overpowering, akin to the strobing effect of Brakhage's 24-paintings-per-second later works.

But Gioli's preoccupation with deconstructing the fundaments of film is not just an empty formal exercise; his formal innovations are always used to some purpose. In Filmarilyn, he deconstructs rolls of fashion film featuring Marilyn Monroe, revealing the black frame around the image in order to highlight the artificiality inherent in such constructions of sexual desire. In Gioli's film, Monroe's inherent desirability and appeal is obvious, but also obvious is the way in which the film frame further constructs her, creating a sexual icon distanced from the sexuality of the woman.

This is consistent with another of Gioli's preoccupations, which is the division of the human body -- an obvious parallel to the division of the film frame. Body parts often appear in detached close-up in Gioli's work, with the focus on one part of the body in isolation from the whole. In Filmarilyn, this appears in a stunning rhythmic sequence where a series of shots of Monroe in motion are punctuated by freeze-frames that focus in, unexpectedly, on a random outjutting elbow or the curve of her hip. The rhythm of the scene intentionally brings to mind a photo-shoot, with each freeze-frame as the picture being taken -- but the unusual choice of images to freeze at creates a fetishization of the body that both parodies and subverts glamorous depictions of female sexuality.

Another film, Quando l'occhio trema, uses imagery from Bunuel's L'age d'or and Un chien andalou as a starting point for a meditation on the eye and vision. In numerous disorienting closeups on the eye, Gioli's jittery aesthetic focuses attention on the eye's (sped-up) movements, while superimpositions link the eyes to both the object being seen and to the other senses. It's a fascinating and memorable film, in effect extending the eye-slicing scene from Bunuel's first film into 10+ minutes, where the close-up examination of the eye and ideas about vision are explored in depth rather than in the visceral seconds dedicated to it in Bunuel's film.

In short, Gioli clearly seems to be a major talent with a very coherent and interesting body of work. I'm looking forward to watching the rest of the films in this set tonight, and I'd highly recommend it to anyone with an interest in experimental film.

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gubbelsj
Joined: Fri Apr 14, 2006 2:44 pm
Location: San Diego

#130 Post by gubbelsj » Wed Jan 31, 2007 1:31 am

I know Tribulation 99 was recently released on DVD, but does anybody know of other, perhaps earlier, Craig Baldwin work available for home viewing? I'm particularly interested in things like Stolen Movie and Wild Gunman. But any additional releases of his work would also be welcome.

Zillertal
Joined: Thu Jan 18, 2007 9:48 am

#131 Post by Zillertal » Wed Jan 31, 2007 6:01 am

Wild Gunman is available as extra in the Tribulation 99 dvd released by othercinema. Never heard of Stolen Movie before, I thought Wild Gunman was his first work.

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Gregory
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 4:07 pm

#132 Post by Gregory » Wed Jan 31, 2007 1:47 pm

Stolen Movie was Baldwin's mixture of footage surreptitiously shot in various movie theaters with Super 8. I would guess that it won't be released. It hasn't been in distribution as have his other films, and Tim Maloney in a Senses of Cinema article last year said that Baldwin considers the film "a kind of prank -- interesting for the implications and the direction of his development more so than as a film in and of itself."
As for the other two, RocketKitKongoKit and O No Coronado!, one could email Baldwin via Other Cinema and ask if there are any plans to release them on DVD and if so I'd bet he'd respond with a straightforward answer. They'd make a nice 2-films-on-1 DVD.

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gubbelsj
Joined: Fri Apr 14, 2006 2:44 pm
Location: San Diego

#133 Post by gubbelsj » Wed Jan 31, 2007 2:16 pm

Thanks Gregory & Zillertal.
I had pretty much assumed Stolen Movie was more of a theoretical experiment than an aesthetically enjoyable film, but I'm quite drawn to pranks of that kind. It would be nice to see it pop up as an extra for us lo-fi types. The Rocket... / O No Coronado pairing is a good idea, and I just might fire off that email. These are good times for avant-garde film, at least in the digital format (filmstrip rentals are definitely going down, which is not good), and it seems like every month or so something exciting is finding a release.

Zillertal
Joined: Thu Jan 18, 2007 9:48 am

#134 Post by Zillertal » Thu Feb 01, 2007 6:36 am

RocketKitCOngoKit, is also part of the Trubulation 99 dvd as an extra. There is only O No Coronado! To be released now.

For those interested, I just purchased a copy of a limited edition on DVD of the Fluxus films, it's currently sold by re:voir. I guess you have to write them for it, it costs 100€ . I'll talk about it when it gets here.

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Gregory
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 4:07 pm

#135 Post by Gregory » Thu Feb 01, 2007 2:33 pm

zillertal wrote:RocketKitCOngoKit, is also part of the Trubulation 99 dvd as an extra. There is only O No Coronado! To be released now.

For those interested, I just purchased a copy of a limited edition on DVD of the Fluxus films, it's currently sold by re:voir. I guess you have to write them for it, it costs 100€ . I'll talk about it when it gets here.
Oops, you're right about RocketKitKongoKit. I haven't watched the new Tribulation 99 DVD yet, but I should do it soon. Since O No Coronado is left unreleased on DVD it doesn't seem like it will happen unless Other Cinema does some kind of eclectic compilation. He could have included it on Tribulation 99 with the others for a kind of early works collection.

I look forward to hearing more about the Fluxus release that you mentioned and how it's different from the FluxFilm Anthology, which is on their site for 30€ or $40.

Zillertal
Joined: Thu Jan 18, 2007 9:48 am

#136 Post by Zillertal » Mon Feb 05, 2007 9:09 am

well, it's in dvd and a limited edition? :P Good item for fetishist collectors like me.

The Fluxus set is amazing, the films come in two dvd9, with notes about them, and the discs come inside a 16mm film canister well decorated, amazing edition! Well woth the 100 euros, it's limited to 100 copies, so if you want it, you have to hurry.

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sevenarts
Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 7:22 pm
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#137 Post by sevenarts » Mon Feb 05, 2007 11:27 am

Zillertal wrote:The Fluxus set is amazing, the films come in two dvd9, with notes about them, and the discs come inside a 16mm film canister well decorated, amazing edition! Well woth the 100 euros, it's limited to 100 copies, so if you want it, you have to hurry.
Are they DVD-Rs, I presume?

Zillertal
Joined: Thu Jan 18, 2007 9:48 am

#138 Post by Zillertal » Mon Feb 05, 2007 1:15 pm

what do you mean by dvd-r? recorded DVDs? no, they're not, factory pressed DVDs.

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Gregory
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 4:07 pm

#139 Post by Gregory » Mon Feb 05, 2007 1:17 pm

Is it the same 37-film, 120-minute anthology they released on tape? I'm thinking there must be something more if it's two discs.

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sevenarts
Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 7:22 pm
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#140 Post by sevenarts » Mon Feb 05, 2007 5:00 pm

Zillertal wrote:what do you mean by dvd-r? recorded DVDs? no, they're not, factory pressed DVDs.
oh ok, i wondered because doing factory-pressed dvds in an edition of 100 seemed kind of odd.

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Gregory
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 4:07 pm

#141 Post by Gregory » Mon Feb 05, 2007 8:37 pm

sevenarts wrote:...doing factory-pressed dvds in an edition of 100 seemed kind of odd.
To me as well, and it makes me wonder if perhaps they did a larger run than 100 and only some are for this limited-edition release. If so, then after the ones in the film cannister sell out, more of the same discs might continue to be offered at a more affordable price. I'll contact Re:Voir and ask.

Zillertal
Joined: Thu Jan 18, 2007 9:48 am

#142 Post by Zillertal » Thu Mar 08, 2007 10:53 am

the two discs have the films only both dvd9, the quality is exquisite, they have no menus, but I think they were originally made on film to be viewed like this. And they wont release further as far as I understood, it is only this limited edition which should be almost sold by now.

They just released David Perlov diary in 7 DVDs ! and le lit de la vierge will follow later this month I think.

planetjake

#143 Post by planetjake » Thu Mar 08, 2007 12:18 pm

Zillertal wrote:They just released David Perlov diary in 7 DVDs ! and le lit de la vierge will follow later this month I think.
Looked it up and my interest is totally peaked... Care to elaborate?

Zillertal
Joined: Thu Jan 18, 2007 9:48 am

#144 Post by Zillertal » Tue Mar 13, 2007 6:31 am

As far as I know, it is a 7 dvd set, each dvd has one diary of around 52 minutes length. This in 6 discs, then the seventh disc is of bonus mateiral, there is also a fat booklet in it, and english subtitles for the hebrew parts, and also french, spanish, italian, hebrew (for the english parts) and deutsch. Hope this helps. In regards of quality, re:voir releases even the vhs ones have an incredible image quality.

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Baron_Blood
Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2007 1:12 am
Location: Existential Hell

#145 Post by Baron_Blood » Mon Apr 16, 2007 11:50 pm

So many great experimental filmmakers and I've only skimmed the surface. However, my favs so far are Shuji Terayama, Frans Zwartjes, Kenneth Anger, Werner Schroeter, Carmelo Bene, Philippe Garrel, Rinse Dream, Peter Tscherkassky, Sergei Parajanov, and Patrick Bokanowski.

I also recently saw a short film by Jean-Pierre Bouyxou called Satan Bouche un Coin. I thought it was pretty amazing. If only I could find more of his work.

Zillertal
Joined: Thu Jan 18, 2007 9:48 am

#146 Post by Zillertal » Tue Apr 24, 2007 10:47 am


Numéro 2
Joined: Tue Oct 18, 2005 3:33 pm

#147 Post by Numéro 2 » Tue Apr 24, 2007 11:11 am

Frans Zwartjes on DVD!!!!!! Finally!
I've never heard about him. Let alone his film. But I'm very curious. Could you tell us some more about him?

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ouatitw
Joined: Tue Dec 19, 2006 11:13 am

#148 Post by ouatitw » Tue Apr 24, 2007 12:04 pm

THIS IS GREAT NEWS!!!!! THANK YOU FOR THE INFORMATION!!

I have only seen about 5 of his films and I really loved Living and Visual Training, in fact Living is one of my favorite experimental films. This is the best news I have heard in a while.

Is there anyway to get this in the US?

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vertovfan
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 7:46 pm

#149 Post by vertovfan » Wed Apr 25, 2007 9:52 am

Just ordered it on the linked website - had to make a couple guesses when filling in information, but everything turned out OK and I actually received a confirmation in English. I hope that "Engels ondertiteld" means there are English subtitles!

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ouatitw
Joined: Tue Dec 19, 2006 11:13 am

#150 Post by ouatitw » Wed Apr 25, 2007 11:27 am

I just did the same, I will post here again when I receive it. It came out be being $41 with the currency exchange and shipping, not too bad. Thanks.

And according to AltaVista's Dutch to English translation: Engels ondertiteld does in fact mean English subtitled. Although I assume that the documentary is what is subtitled because I do not remember any dialog present in the 4, I have seen. Although maybe dialog is present in the others.

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