Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

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colinr0380
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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#776 Post by colinr0380 » Fri Jan 25, 2019 12:57 pm

Mr. Deltoid wrote:
Fri Jan 25, 2019 8:46 am
I never thought I'd type these words, but there's a couple of notable screenings on True Movies next week.

Jodie Foster's Beaver (sorry, The Beaver) gets a screening on Monday night at 9PM. I never bothered with this one when it came out, but I'll give it a whirl anyway. I can't remember if this has had a screening on UK TV or not (Channel 4 maybe?).
Then, Tuesday night, 11.10, a rare screening of 1995's killer Brit-flick The Young Poisoner's Handbook, which is still criminally unavailable on DVD!
I did not notice it until the time had passed but The Beaver only recently got premiered on the Sony Movie Channel on Thursday 10th, so its still a relatively recent arrival to wider free satellite television (albeit it is not available on Freeview, so I rarely mention films on that channel). The Sony Movie Channel seems to have Only God Forgives in quite heavy rotation as well, which also has not reached the 'normal' channels as yet, if ever.

Speaking of things that I missed and only just became aware of, More4 has been showing the recent TV series of The Crimson Rivers (they are showing episode 3 of 8 tonight at 9 p.m.). This apparently takes place after the events of the first two films. I have not seen the second film as yet (which apparently has Christopher Lee in it, and looks a bit Dan Brown anticipatory. And it was directed by Olivier Dahan just before he made La Vie En Rose!), but I really enjoyed the first film, which starts off serial killer-police procedural and goes completely sci-fi nutty for the wonderfully delirious climax involving:
SpoilerShow
secret experimental societies (tying it in with that early 2000s trend that includes The Skulls and the German film Anatomy), a memorable fight sequence between Vincent Cassell and a group of neo-Nazis, avalanches and multiple clones of the love interest!
The first film also has a great score too! It is difficult to imagine how the TV series could approach some of the spectacle of the films, but I thought it might be worth a watch!
Last edited by colinr0380 on Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#777 Post by jlnight » Tue Jan 29, 2019 11:52 am

The Big Gamble, Sat 2nd Feb, Talking Pictures. Also on Tue 5th Feb.

Ride in the Whirlwind, Tue 5th Feb, 5Spike. (Masters of the Universe seems to be playing on this channel from Sun 3rd Feb).

Blue Velvet (followed by The Straight Story), Fri 8th Feb, Film4.

I think I saw They Shall Not Grow Old in the advanced schedules but it seems to have disappeared. Maybe a repeat is on the cards soon. Also in the Bros documentary it was actually the 'Studio 7' sign not a fire exit sign that the camera filmed while you could hear their bickering from beyond. As with Luke, "I can live with it".

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colinr0380
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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#778 Post by colinr0380 » Tue Jan 29, 2019 6:22 pm

According to the Radio Times, They Shall Not Grow Old is getting a repeat on BBC2 at 9 p.m. on Saturday 2nd

Premiere-wise Channel 4 has Jason Bourne at 9 p.m. on Saturday 2nd as well as Demolition with Jake Gyllenhaal and Naomi Watts at 12.15 a.m. on Monday 4th (which looks worryingly like this decade's Life As A House). Channel 5 has the 2016 remake of The Magnificent Seven at 9 p.m. on Sunday 3rd. Film4 is showing World War Two drama Anthropoid at 9 p.m. on Tuesday 5th. The Horror Channel has Conjuring spin-off The Nun at 9 p.m. on Saturday 2nd and Redwood at 9 p.m. on Friday 8th. And tucked away on the Sony Movie Channel at 9 p.m. on Friday 8th is another film directed by Jodie Foster, Money Monster.

A Matter of Life and Death is being shown on BBC2 on Sunday 3rd at 1.50 p.m., with a Talking Pictures programme collecting David Niven's various chat show appearances on before it at 1 p.m.

BBC4's 'slow season' continues with A Slow Odyssey: The Great Wall of China at 8 p.m. on Sunday 3rd. BBC4 has the first two episodes of Australian thriller Safe Harbour at 9 p.m. on Saturday 2nd. At 10 p.m. on Friday 8th BBC4 is showing the first two episodes of HBO/Netflix series The Defiant Ones. And strangely BBC2 is showing the first two episodes of Mayans M.C. at 10.40 p.m. on Saturday 2nd, which is the spin-off series from Sons of Anarchy. It is strange because Sons of Anarchy got tucked away almost a decade ago on the 5USA digital channel, and I don't think they ever finished the whole run, so this is the biggest exposure that either series has received on UK television!

Also I caught the first of three episodes on BBC2 last night of Inside Europe: Ten Years of Turmoil with candid interviews with paired couples of Jean-Claude Junker and Donald Tusk, François Hollande and Nicolas Sarkozy, as well as George Osborne and Nick Clegg, along with advisors to Angela Merkel and Cameron for behind the scenes gossip (Merkel herself, as with Nigel Farage, appear at a remove in stock footage that eerily equates them together). The first one was all about the run up to the 2016 European referendum that led to Brexit and performed the remarkable feat of almost making me feel sorry for David Cameron, unable to 'work around' the desires of either the Europeans or his own party! The second episode, Going For Broke, at 9 p.m. on Monday 4th, is going to focus on the Greek monetary crisis, when the country was basically placed in hock to the IMF.
Last edited by colinr0380 on Sat Feb 02, 2019 8:20 am, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#779 Post by colinr0380 » Sat Feb 02, 2019 5:43 am

I also managed to catch a repeat of that BBC documentary about Germaine Greer last night, which was wonderful and made me despair a bit at the same time. Mostly extremely glad for the presence of Greer unafraid to tackle female empowerment and how women are viewed societally in her own manner rather than being beholden to particular agendas of the day (there's a very amusing moment when talking about #MeToo when she comments on all of the women wearing black in solidarity at the Golden Globes but still with revealing dresses and their cleavage on full show for the cameras (Greer puts it in blunter terms!), which she highlights as the bigger form of sexual display for men that goes unaddressed and mostly uncommented on), and as with any great thinker there is always the sense that she is actually wrestling with the issues in the present rather than existing only in the context of the work done in the past and having that be only work, and the point of view, that she is known for. Which of course makes her harder to pin down in media terms too!

This is a digression but it was ironic that the repeat followed an episode of Front Row Late which debated censorship in all forms, from whether that Jamie Bulger short film should have been allowed to be nominated at the Oscars which two of the commentators had decided not to see in solidarity with the mother's wishes, but which left them rather at a loose end for things to say on a panel show; to the BBFC changes to sexual violence, which caused concerns about being too lax in censorship even now; and the general sense of the entire programme that censorship was a good and necessary thing unless it comes in the form of a Fatwa from 'outside' the culture. I have always felt it is better to face things head on and actually deal with them, or if you cannot deal with them at least you are aware of certain issues existing, rather than expecting (or indeed hoping) that someone else is acting as a mediator to protect you (or others) from content. Censorship often feels about a mediator stepping in to protect people 'for their own good', much like a policeman for the mind, and it is never good to cede control of that to any particular group or cause. Instead we should be fostering intellectual curiosity and the ability to argue (in the good sense of the word!) and reason. In exploring why we find a particular view abhorrent or upsetting and providing a counter-position that should both help to allow certain views from going unopposed and help someone to explore their own feelings towards a subject in more detail. You might not be in danger of changing your position on a topic (but sometimes I feel that censorship is used as a blunt tool to keep from the slightest possibility of having to do so), but a healthy debate can evolve your own feelings on a topic more as well.

That really ties into the Germaine Greer piece in that it felt that her main point in the Female Eunuch, and only being repeated more in the face of being 'called out' on not pledging full allegiance to such movements as #MeToo, was not just about female empowerment and opposition to male patriarchy but also about the ability to self-determination in all spheres of life, which comes with great responsibility too of being true to yourself and not allowing yourself to be coerced or put in exploitative positions in the first place. Or at least of fully owning choices that may have been made, for one's own peace of mind as much as anything. That before abuse or sexual violence occurs literally, oppression and domination often has to have already occurred in other forms to have brought you into that orbit. That seems to be why Greer comments on supporting equality of women being allowed to serve in the army, but also notes that then they'll only end up doing the same things as men in those roles do (even some of the worst actions if we consider Abu Ghraib), because the structure they are entering is still a masculine one and works by those values.

The thing that really worried me is the state of intellectual debate, especially on the media, but also from those meetings shown where everyone is supposed to have a pre-defined position on an issue coming in and in fact that is part of the reason why they were booked to appear and speak in the first place, to espouse that expected position and nothing more. Although I don't know if I am just seeing this as someone only familiar with the way debate has been shown on television over the last twenty years approaching with the rose-tinted view of how vibrant the 1960s and 70s were for debate about all sorts of issues, and perhaps further back it was no different, but it is a bit depressing to see Greer getting made up to go on UK breakfast show Good Morning Britain (with a female show runner slightly condescendingly pre-explaining to Greer about why her views on transgender people are wrong) before the chat with Susannah Reid and her male companion. That is the equivalent of the backstage bit in that recent Bros brothers film, though it is more upsetting to see one of our foremost intellectuals in that position than a couple of bickering 80s boy band members!

Where are the programmes, aside from the documentary that we are watching (that, like the film on Nicolas Roeg, has presumably been commissioned and created in anticipation of acting as a euology at some hopefully distant point), that actually are about intellectual debate and ideas being explored? What avenues does someone like Germaine Greer have now on the media to maintain some sort of presence other than soundbite style, we have two minutes for this topic, breakfast chat shows and appearances on game shows? Combined with the final shots of Greer giving a lot of her books away as she prepares to move house (to Oxfam, because "nobody keeps a library anymore") and there is a rather upsetting melancholy about the final passage. Not exactly for Germaine Greer herself, but for the world around her which does not know, or care, about what it is losing.
Last edited by colinr0380 on Sat Feb 02, 2019 8:22 am, edited 3 times in total.

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Mr. Deltoid
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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#780 Post by Mr. Deltoid » Sat Feb 02, 2019 7:18 am

colinr0380 wrote:
Sat Feb 02, 2019 5:43 am
I also managed to catch a repeat of that BBC documentary about Germaine Greer last night, which was wonderful and made me despair a bit at the same time. Mostly extremely glad for the presence of Greer unafraid to tackle female empowerment and how women are viewed societally in her own manner rather than being beholden to particular agendas of the day (there's a very amusing moment when talking about #MeToo when she comments on all of the women wearing black in solidarity at the Golden Globes but still with revealing dresses and their cleavage on full show for the cameras (Greer puts it in blunter terms!), which she highlights as the bigger form of sexual display for men that goes unaddressed and mostly uncommented on), and as with any great thinker there is always the sense that she is actually wrestling with the issues in the present rather than existing only in the context of the work done in the past and having that be only work, and the point of view, that she is known for. Which of course makes her harder to pin down in media terms too!

This is a digression but it was ironic that the repeat followed an episode of Front Row Late which debated censorship in all forms (from whether that Jamie Bulger short film should have been allowed to be nominted at the Oscars which two of the commentators had decided not to see in solidarity with the mother's wishes, but which left them rather at a loose end for things to say on a panel show; to the BBFC changes to sexual violence, which caused concerns about being too lax in censorship even now; and the general sense of the entire programme that censorship was a good and necessary thing unless it comes in the form of a Fatwa from 'outside' the culture. I have always felt it is better to face things head on and actually deal with them, or if you cannot deal with them at least you are aware of certain issues existing, rather than expecting (or indeed hoping) than someone else is acting as a mediator to protect you (or others) from content. Censorship often feels about a mediator stepping in to protect people 'for their own good', much like a policeman for the mind, and it is never good to cede control of that to any particular group or cause. Instead we should be fostering intellectual curiosity and the ability to argue (in the good sense of the word!) and reason. In exploring why we find a particular view abhorrent or upsetting and providing a counter-position that should both help to allow certain views from going unopposed and help someone to explore their own feelings towards a subject in more detail. You might not be in danger of changing your position on a topic (but sometimes I feel that censorship is used as a blunt tool to keep from the slightest possibility of having to do so), but a healthy debate can evolve your own feelings on a topic more as well.

That really ties into the Germaine Greer piece in that it felt that her main point in the Female Eunuch, and only being repeated more in the face of being 'called out' on not pledging full allegiance to such movements as #MeToo, was not just about female empowerment and opposition to male patriarchy but also about the ability to self-determination in all spheres of life, which comes with great responsibility too of being true to yourself and not allowing yourself to be coerced or put in exploitative positions in the first place. Or at least of fully owning choices that may have been made, for one's own piece of mind as much as anything. That before abuse or sexual violence occurs literally, oppression and domination often has to have already occurred in other forms to have brought you into that orbit. That seems to by why Greer comments on supporting equality of women being allowed to serve in the army, but also notes that then they'll only end up doing the same things as men in those roles do (even some of the worst actions if we consider Abu Ghraib), because the structure they are entering is still a masculine one and works by those values.

The thing that really worried me is the state of intellectual debate, especially on the media, but also from those meetings shown where everyone is supposed to have a pre-defined position on an issue coming in and in fact that is part of the reason why they were booked to appear and speak in the first place, to espouse that expected position and nothing more. Although I don't know if I am just seeing this as someone only familiar with the way debate has been shown on television over the last twenty years with the rose-tinted view of how vibrant the 1960s and 70s were for debate about all sorts of issues, and perhaps further back it was no different, but it is a bit depressing to see Greer getting made up to go on UK breakfast show Good Morning Britain (with a female show runner slightly condescendingly pre-explaining to Greer about why her views on transgender people are wrong) before the chat with Susannah Reid and her male companion. That is the equivalent of the backstage bit in that recent Bros brothers film, though it is more upsetting to see one of our foremost intellectuals in that position than a couple of bickering 80s boy band members!

Where are the programmes, aside from the documentary that we are watching (that, like the film on Nicolas Roeg, has presumably been commissioned and created in anticipation of acting as a euology at some hopefully distant point), that actually are about intellectual debate and ideas being explored? What avenues does someone like Germaine Greer have now on the media to maintain some sort of presence other than soundbite style, we have two minutes for this topic, breakfast chat shows and appearances on game shows? Combined with the final shots of Greer giving a lot of her books away as she prepares to move house (to Oxfam, because "nobody keeps a library anymore") and there is a rather upsetting melancholy about the final passage. Not exactly for Germaine Greer herself, but for the world around her which does not know, or care, about what it is losing.
It was an interesting portrait of Germaine Greer, though I'd liked to have seen a more focused one-on-one conversation about contemporary hot-button issues (namely the identity-based zealotry that currently characterises today's Third Wave Feminists and the gutless, 'no platforming' of many older feminists, including Greer, who refuse to follow their ideological line) rather than the, admittedly fascinating, retrospective nature of the piece. However, who could resist those archive clips of Greer fearlessly taking on the seemingly endless gallery of male commentators of the day? I'd liked to have seen more of the fascinating Town Bloody Hall, a filmed-record of an early '70's public debate (in New York I think) with Norman Mailer and shot by D.A. Pennebaker! Compare the hot-house atmosphere of that footage with the brief contemporary clip of Greer backstage at Good Morning Britain (aforementioned above by Colin), being patronisingly told to her mind her ideological P's & Q's regarding tran-genderism to see the way in which current debate has seemingly de-evolved over the past fifty years.
Regarding the melancholy of the overall piece, the doc does seem to go out of it's way to cast Germaine Greer as a rather isolated figure as she wanders solitary around her country grounds, like a revolutionary in exile. Which, in a way, I suppose she is.

jlnight
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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#781 Post by jlnight » Mon Feb 04, 2019 7:44 pm

Under the Wire, Mon 11th Feb, BBC4.

The Shooting, Tue 12th Feb, 5Spike.

The New York Hat (short), Wed 13th Feb, Talking Pictures.

Thief of Bagdad, Sat 16th Feb, Talking Pictures. Also Sun 24th Feb.

80,000 Suspects, Sun 17th Feb, Talking Pictures.
Bless This House (film), Sun 17th Feb, Talking Pictures. Also Fri 22nd Feb.

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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#782 Post by colinr0380 » Wed Feb 06, 2019 4:48 am

It could be titled "When women go off to war" next week. jlnight has noted the big premiere of documentary Under The Wire on BBC4 at 10 p.m., about the journalist Marie Colvin who was killed in Syria in 2012 (It is also the week in which the film A Private War, where Rosamund Pike plays Colvin, is released in the cinema), which perhaps contrasts with Whiskey Tango Foxtrot (which is apparently also a war film rather than my hoped for Shall We Dance?-style musical piece in which an alcoholic tries to reconnect with her estranged daughter by joining a dance troupe) showing on Film4 at 11.10 p.m. on Wednesday 13th. And there is a repeat of the 'Helen Mirren in army fatigues, ordering drone strikes' film Eye In The Sky on Film4 at 9 p.m. on Sunday 10th.

Cloud Atlas has not appeared on UK television as yet, but Channel 5 have jumped over it to get straight to Mila Kunis's star making role in Jupiter Ascending at 6.30 p.m. on Sunday 10th.

But perhaps the biggest news of the week is that after six years Rick and Morty is getting its first UK television screening, with the first two episodes of series 1 showing on E4 from 10 p.m. on Friday 15th. That's a show probably best described as what would happen if Doc Brown from Back To The Future was still an inventing genius but also an alcoholic lunatic with no regards for common standards of decency, notions of consent or the safety of his travelling companions!
Last edited by colinr0380 on Wed Feb 06, 2019 8:31 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#783 Post by jlnight » Wed Feb 06, 2019 6:09 am

That's interesting - Rick and Morty has been on TruTV before (in 2016 I think) as part of their Adult Swim block along with Mr Pickles, Your Pretty Face is Going to Hell and The Eric Andre Show, briefly, so has seen some exposure on Freeview. The first series was on rotation and contained some nasty bits, nastier than you would expect from animated shows like this. I recall some episodes ran out of steam.

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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#784 Post by colinr0380 » Wed Feb 06, 2019 7:53 am

Yes, the first couple of episodes are funny but it is also rather crude as well, though I love the duelling plots of the second episode where the satire of dream diving in Inception ("if this doesn't make any sense, that means your favourite film doesn't make any sense") contrasts against the device giving dogs super-intelligence (leading to the line "Where are my testicles, Summer?") . I would recommend at least watching the third episode, Anatomy Park (Fantastic Voyage meets Jurassic Park in the body of a hobo war veteran dying of tuberculosis and various STDs), before giving up on the series though!

Following the first two episodes E4 also have The Robot Chicken Walking Dead Special: Look Who's Walking at 11.05 p.m. (which is the first episode of the latest season, season 9), which might also be the first Robot Chicken related material to appear on any of the main channels aside from a couple of asides in Family Guy episodes.

(I have a feeling that this is all part of E4's reaction to The Big Bang Theory coming to an end soon, as they seem to almost be forced at this point to try out different things to fill the schedule with!)
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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#785 Post by thirtyframesasecond » Wed Feb 06, 2019 3:01 pm

R&M gets even funnier - "Meeseeks and Destroy" must be coming up (and you'll like "Something Ricked This Way Comes" for its Bradbury riffing), but in S2 the three episode run of "Total Rickall", "Get Schwifty" and "The Ricks Must Be Crazy" is where it hits its peak.

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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#786 Post by colinr0380 » Thu Feb 07, 2019 4:16 am

This actually inspired me to watch my discs of the first season in preparation, and I certainly agree on "Meeseeks and Destroy" which reaches a horrible peak when it shows multiple Mr Meeseek's getting pushed into murderous insanity over the impossibility of reducing Jerry's golf average, let alone when it contrasts against Morty's simultaneous harrowing bathroom toilet based attempted sexual assault by Mr Jellybean!

I particularly like Raising Gazorpazorp (the Zardoz influenced one with the big heads spewing out not guns but instead sex droids to the brutish men, and the clichéd version of the all-female paradise and its mall with the "Chocolate and Shoes" shop!), or the existential alternate universe swapping terror of the ending of Rick Potion #9 (which maybe had an influence on one of the episodes of Futurama's last season), as well as its brief call back to where the bodies of the previous Rick and Mortys have been buried a couple of episodes further on, to suggest that Morty is still mentally scarred by that experience.

I did love "Something Ricked This Way Comes" for the Bradbury structure, as well as the riff on Stephen King's Needful Things, with the novel approach to dealing with cursed items! Plus "Rixty Minutes" for the freeform approach to the episode of simply just channel surfing through intergalactic weirdness for an entire show. And "Close Rick-enounters of the Rick-kind" for throwing thousands of parallel universe Ricks and Mortys together, including that gobsmacking mass-Morty torture device and the revelation of an actually decent Rick out there somewhere! (Not to mention vice versa with Morty!)

Basically I liked the entire first season (I really like that the more 'grounded' stuff with the mother, father and sister just ends up seeming even more bizarre when we cut back to it, acting like a strange cutaway gag in comparison to the otherworldly shenanigans taking up most of an episode), so it is good to know that it gets better!

(Rick's over the top burping gets toned down a little after the first episode too! But I do like that it always stays a show about people continually messily stumbling and struggling to get their thoughts in order and to get their words out!)

__

On a slightly different, less serious, note the second episode of Inside Europe: Ten Years of Turmoil was fascinating. In all of the discussions about the Greek financial crisis and the way Alexi Tsipras was elected on a platform of reversing austerity only to immediately have that idea negated by the European Parliament as unacceptable (much like the position David Cameron was later in over the Brexit referendum), this series is pretty much illustrating the fundamental problems of the European Union that were pretty obvious from the very formation. Which is that you have a governing structure made up of leaders who each still feel that they have some form of power because they lead their country and have been elected by their people as Prime Minister, only to find that any mandate they have been given means less than nothing on the European stage. They end up trapped powerlessly between the demands of their voters (and parliaments) on one side and the demands of the European Parliament on the other. (and we inevitably know who wins out in those conflicts: the IMF) Which is only strengthening my question of just who exactly would want to become a Prime Minister anyway?

This suggests to me that the European Union is in the worst of both worlds, neither allowing its members individual autonomy to deal with their own problems, or to be like the United States and have one single governing body that is able to rule the entire bloc with impunity without the threat of having one of the bigger individual states (i.e. the equivalent of Germany or France) taking control of the direction of the country (in that sense the Prime Ministers of France, Germany, Italy etc are really like the Mayors of individual American states, but all still each acting as if they are the President - i.e. the worst of both worlds!). In a sense the EU is already there (which is one of the reasons why I think there was such ambivalence towards it in the UK), it is just still pretending to be a collection of individual states co-operating loosely and that political representatives of each country still have more power than they actually really do to influence the specific 'big issues' that are affecting the lives of people within each specific country. Who knows what will happen when people realise the leaders they vote into power in each of their countries have little influence? Maybe nothing will, except brief protests at austerity, as shown in the Greece situation.

The third and last episode of the series next Monday is on the Syrian refugee crisis.
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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#787 Post by colinr0380 » Thu Feb 07, 2019 2:18 pm

Here we are, apparently it is going to be "Adult Swim Fridays" on E4 now.

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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#788 Post by thirtyframesasecond » Thu Feb 07, 2019 2:40 pm

Ah, "Close Rick-enounters of the Rick-kind" includes the Mumford and Sons joke that doesn't quite gain the laugh Rick expects!

Best performance in the Inside Europe series is definitely from Sarkozy, who hams it up tremendously well.

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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#789 Post by colinr0380 » Tue Feb 12, 2019 3:55 pm

Another good week next week: the Keanu Reeves thriller John Wick is on Channel 5 at 9 p.m. on Sunday 17th (I really want the main character to say "I have just about reached the end of my wick now!" at some point in this film series), but just as exciting is the premiere of Sean Baker's shot on iPhone film Tangerine (NSFW) on Film4 at 11.15 p.m. on Monday 18th.

Late notice but since we have just learnt about Arrow releasing demonlover, starring Connie Nielsen, Channel 4 is showing the recent Danish TV series Liberty starring Nielsen (and Sofie Gråbøl). The first episode is tonight at 2.50 a.m.(!), then episode 2 is the morning of Tuesday 19th at 2.45 a.m. (!!) and episode 3 is in the early hours of Wednesday 20th at 3.10 a.m. (!!!). The last two episodes will hopefully be on the week after that.

On Thursday 21st, BBC4 has another Mark Kermode Secrets of Cinema episode at 9 p.m., this time devoted to the Oscars and the tropes of 'the Oscar winning film', followed by The Artist at 10 p.m.

And the other item of interest is showing in BBC4's Friday night slot devoted to music on 22nd February. Before the last two episodes of The Defiant Ones from 10.30 p.m. is a film about the movie music score, called simply Score, showing at 9 p.m.

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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#790 Post by reaky » Tue Feb 12, 2019 6:15 pm

colinr0380 wrote:And the other item of interest is showing in BBC4's Friday night slot devoted to music on 22nd February. Before the last two episodes of The Defiant Ones from 10.30 p.m. is a film about the movie music score, called simply Score, showing at 9 p.m.
Spilled my tea at the thought of the Beeb showing the Radley Metzger film.

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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#791 Post by colinr0380 » Tue Feb 12, 2019 6:22 pm

Sadly now you have me pining for the early days of Channel 5 when it was all late night Shannon Tweed and Russ Meyer instead of roulette gambling shows! Though I guess Score would have even been a bit much even for them at that time!

Or late 90s Channel 4. Gosh those were the days!

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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#792 Post by jlnight » Wed Feb 13, 2019 1:09 pm

La La Land, Sat 23rd Feb, BBC2.
The Neon Demon, Sat 23rd Feb, Film4.

Marguerite, Sun 24th Feb, BBC4.

I had no idea Dr. Dre was a Nirvana fan.

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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#793 Post by reaky » Wed Feb 13, 2019 1:12 pm

Channel Four’s 1980s Red Triangle strand gave Themroc and Identification of a Woman their only terrestrial UK TV screenings, I think. They discontinued it when it turned out it was drawing more horny teenage boys than adventurous cinéastes.

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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#794 Post by colinr0380 » Wed Feb 13, 2019 1:53 pm

Well you know what they say: today's horny teenager is tomorrow's adventurous cineaste!

Sadly I was a bit too young to catch the Red Triangle Season (especially sad to have missed the two Shuji Terayama films, which also have never turned up since), though Channel 4 were still great throughout the 90s, especially with the Exploitica (Nude On The Moon! The Curious Dr Humpp) and Eurotika (I Am A Nymphomaniac and I Am Frigid..Why?, Female Vampire, Frustration, Four Times That Night) seasons in their 4Later strand. But it was really over by 2001 once Big Brother really got going and its CCTV live stream footage colonised the overnight schedules for months on end.

Amazing that The Neon Demon is going to turn up on Film4! That seems quite extreme even for that channel!

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reaky
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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#795 Post by reaky » Wed Feb 13, 2019 2:54 pm

Ah, Eurotika was great! Some of the episodes occasionally turn up as extras on blu-rays (the Jean Rollin one is on Redemption’s Fascination; José Larraz on the BFI’s Symptoms; Michael Reeves on Odeon’s Witchfinder General). The series was a labour of love by Pete Tombs.

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Mr. Deltoid
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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#796 Post by Mr. Deltoid » Wed Feb 13, 2019 4:58 pm

colinr0380 wrote:
Wed Feb 13, 2019 1:53 pm
Well you know what they say: today's horny teenager is tomorrow's adventurous cineaste!

Sadly I was a bit too young to catch the Red Triangle Season (especially sad to have missed the two Shuji Terayama films, which also have never turned up since), though Channel 4 were still great throughout the 90s, especially with the Exploitica (Nude On The Moon! The Curious Dr Humpp) and Eurotika (I Am A Nymphomaniac and I Am Frigid..Why?, Female Vampire, Frustration, Four Times That Night) seasons in their 4Later strand. But it was really over by 2001 once Big Brother really got going and its CCTV live stream footage colonised the overnight schedules for months on end.

Amazing that The Neon Demon is going to turn up on Film4! That seems quite extreme even for that channel!
God, I miss all that stuff - the late '90's, early '00's, when terrestrial channels still possessed a modicum of creativity with their late-night schedules! I loved both Eurotika! and Exploitica, which nurtured my love for all things cult (sic), although I only caught a couple of episodes of the former at the time (the Michael Reeves one - followed by She Beast! - and whatever the subject was that preceded Frustration - French Erotica?). Exploitica was just great though; the kind of thing you couldn't simply just record to watch later, but had to actively stay awake for, when it's surrealist humour could be better appreciated. As well as those clips noted above by Colin, I remember weekly instalments of the singing-cowboy oddity, The Phantom Empire, I Spit on Your Grave (still unavailable at the time, if I remember?) and the Tod Slaughter vehicle, Sweeny Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street) A few years later, when I started buying Something Weird DVDs, I realised that many of the company's featured films and shorts were familiar to me from Exploitica, so I guess the production company had originally licensed material from them.

I used to love Vids and The Trip as well . . .

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colinr0380
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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#797 Post by colinr0380 » Wed Feb 13, 2019 7:41 pm

Exploitica (NSFW!) was amazing for its cheeky re-editing of clips. I Spit On Your Grave was not available at the time that they re-edited it, and subversively added tense action music to all of the revenge moments! The Phantom Empire was used in a great manner actually as a weekly serial, even if it was dubbed and layered over with comments! And I particularly like the episode in which Just Jaeckin's notorious S&M classic The Story of O was re-told as the story of a particularly naive and trusting young lady just 'accidentally' getting into all manner of situations: The Story of D'Oh!

I liked Vids, and even though it was often rather crude I did think it looked rather fun to run a video shop! Probably the reality was not quite as glamorous as they made it look! I seem to remember that they even introduced a season of classic Godzilla movies over the Christmas period of 1999 (NSFW), which was quite important as that was the first time that any of the films were shown in their original Japanese versions with subtitles rather than in the usual dubbed form, and for the series showing many of the early black and white titles. Though that was also the last showing of any Godzilla film in any form on UK television since that time, aside from the Roland Emmerich film.

The last gasp was the other great Pete Tombs series that tied in with one of his books, the Mondo Macabro one from 2001, which showed titles like Alucarda and The Killing of Satan. After that there just was not the space on Channel 4 for seasons of arthouse or wilder exploitation films (aside from the great Cinema Iran one in 2003 that briefly bucked the trend, and the regular Indian film series), and unfortunately Film4 did not quite pick up the slack in that respect, showing more modern arthouse offerings with the occasional brief flurry of content like the Naruse season that basically showed the contents of the BFI set. There were times in the 90s where showings of certain films on television were preceding any kind of home video or theatrical release, whereas now it seems as if the schedulers are more content to show films that are still interesting but have been already available on home video formats for a while.

I loved The Trip too and really wish there was a disc of all of the episodes. At the time I pretty much took it for granted and was watching it more for the use of the NASA archive footage that the first series was entirely built around. I felt a bit less enthused by the second series where the NASA structure fell away and it just became archive footage in general, but on later viewings of episodes I really liked those as well, especially when I approached the show more from the perspective of appreciating the music and the way it was being edited to the images, or rather the way that images are being edited to the music.

There have been three particular sequences that stuck with me from The Trip over the years. The first was the entire second half of episode 3 but especially the end of that episode - all of the episodes of the first series did a stylistic thing of fast reversing all the way back through the entire episode of the archive footage at the very end, finishing up with the rocket with "The Trip" superimposed on the side of it coming in to land instead of taking off (sometimes it seemed that the forward running footage was occasionally put in there more for the impact it would have on being reversed at the end!), and that one particular episode featured footage of an impassioned speech about how leaders were using money for space exploration whilst doing nothing to save the "starving, poor people of Earth", just before the episode reversed to the Roygbiv track by Boards of Canada. That was incredibly moving. I also love a whole sequence to P.E.T.R.O.L. by Orbital that intermixes footage of extreme back exercises, black and white Russian films about death, Silent Hill "You Died" footage, doctors walking purposefully in groups down hospital corridors and circuses which annoyingly seems to have disappeared on me at the moment (but this glorious puppet show should serve well in its stead!). And I just love the fantastic editing and flow of this three song, ten minute sequence from the second series (NSFW) with that intense final track feeling a bit like how I would want an adaptation of Gravity's Rainbow to look! (Plus I love the cheeky slam of Communist China in the "Intermission"!)

The nearest thing to The Trip now is perhaps Adult Swim's Off The Air series, which is why I hope that, now that E4 is starting with "Adult Swim Fridays", those shows might turn up too.
Last edited by colinr0380 on Tue May 14, 2019 4:02 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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colinr0380
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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#798 Post by colinr0380 » Tue Feb 19, 2019 6:45 pm

Image
You can tell the schedulers know it is the Academy Awards next weekend as a lot of films appear to be tailored towards it: La La Land on BBC2 at 9 p.m. on Saturday 23rd most obviously but also the repeat of Dom Hemingway (with Richard E. Grant in a supporting role) on BBC1 at 11.55 p.m. on the 23rd, the premiere of The Boss (starring Melissa McCarthy) on Channel 4 at 10 p.m. on the 23rd, a repeat of Ida (directed by Pawel Pawlikowski) on Film4 at 11.45 p.m. on Monday 25th, Out of the Furnace (starring Christan Bale) on Film4 at 11.25 p.m. on Tuesday 26th, and the Old Boy remake by Spike Lee on Channel 4 at 00.25 a.m. on Friday 1st.

Of course the eminently gif-able Neon Demon is showing on Film4 at 11.15 p.m. on Saturday 23rd, but there are a number of other very strange films that I am not quite sure what to make of getting their first showing too. The other big premiere is probably Marguerite (aka the completely fictional, legally distinct French version of Florence Foster Jenkins!) on BBC4 at 10 p.m. on Sunday 24th. At 2.30 p.m. on Sunday 24th Channel 4 are showing Monster Trucks (aka the film that seems to have fundamentally misunderstood what monster trucks actually are as some sort of environmental fracking metaphor in which driving cars fast actually saves wildlife!). A bit more interesting is Dark Night, a film that I was not previously aware of but which is apparently a fictionalised ensemble drama that takes its premise from the 2012 incident in Colorado of the shootings in the theatre showing The Dark Knight Rises. It probably will not reach Elephant-levels (and I am already concerned by the blank looking killers playing violent video games in the trailer) and it is the kind of thing that could easily seem exploitative in a bad way, but apparently it has been deemed worthy of a television screening unlike the Gus Van Sant film so far. That is on Channel 4 at 1.05 a.m. in the early hours of Monday 25th.

Did you know that they tried making Transporter films without Jason Statham starring in them? Because I didn't! The Transporter Refuelled is on Channel 5 at 9 p.m. on Sunday 24th. Will it be as successful in replacing its leading man as The Bourne Legacy was?

TV movie-wise Channel 5 are showing From Glory To Murder: Oscar Pistorious at 2.20 p.m. on Tuesday 26th. And also on Channel 5 at 9 p.m. on Wednesday 27th is USS Indianapolis: Men of Courage starring Nicolas Cage and directed by Mario Van Peebles. Which the Radio Times has given the rare distinction of a one star "Poor" rating to (Monster Trucks in contrast gets three!), which almost automatically makes it a must see! I remember really liking Mission of the Shark, the 1991 TV movie version of the same events, starring Stacy Keach and written by Alan Sharp, though if this newer version is anything like that one it will be rather harrowing and nowhere near as fun as the idea of World War II, atomic bombs and sharks would suggest. That film is in a Nicolas Cage double bill with a repeat of the 2008 Bangkok Dangerous at 11.35 p.m, which is a sort of remake of Danny and Oxide Pang's 2000 original, though it differs in a few significant ways (Danny and Oxide Pang are probably better known for directing the original Thai version of The Eye, though whilst they appear to have been working consistently, both together and separately, since the Bangkok Dangerous remake, a lot of their more recent films have unfortunately passed me by. Though I would like to see Out of the Inferno, since I quite enjoy Backdraft or Towering Inferno-type films. I even have Skyscraper somewhere in my to watch pile!)

And just when next week could not get any stranger, the Horror channel is showing the WWE produced Leprechaun: Origins at 9 p.m. on Friday 1st! :shock:
Last edited by colinr0380 on Mon Feb 25, 2019 12:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.

jlnight
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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#799 Post by jlnight » Fri Feb 22, 2019 10:27 am

See Me (short), late Tues 26th Feb, Film4.

Three Identical Strangers, Thu 28th Feb, Channel 4.
Inland Empire, starts Thu 28th Feb, London Live.

Hunt for the Wilderpeople (followed by Boy), Mon 4th March, Film4.

Filmworker, Thu 7th March, Film4. Followed by The Killing (1956).

Leaving Neverland is being screened on Channel 4, in two parts, on Wed 6th March and Thu 7th March. Apparently Jacko's estate is not happy with this HBO/Channel 4 co-production. I have no idea if there is anything left to add to this story.

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colinr0380
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Re: Upcoming Movies on TV (UK)

#800 Post by colinr0380 » Sat Feb 23, 2019 8:39 am

Also from Monday at 6.25 a.m. and continuing every weekday at the same time, Channel 4 are showing Cheers from the very beginning in triple bills of episodes.

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