Jean-Luc Godard

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accatone
Joined: Thu May 04, 2006 8:04 am

Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#1051 Post by accatone » Fri Aug 09, 2019 11:20 am


quim_font
Joined: Fri May 11, 2018 12:55 pm

Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#1052 Post by quim_font » Fri Aug 09, 2019 2:19 pm

NWRdr4 wrote:
Fri Aug 09, 2019 10:51 am

Thanks so much for this! I didn’t know about Godard liking Jon Jost!

Detective is a funny case because it’s also dedicated to Clint Eastwood—leading many to assume Godard likes his films. However, the only explicit reference I can find Godard making to Eastwood was during his 1978 lectures at Concordia University where he expressed his disdain for Eastwood’s work and called him “a complete idiot” (the translated lectures can be bought here). Either a lot changed between 1978 and 1985, or Godard’s dedication to Eastwood was decidedly more ambivalent or abstract than an outright endorsement.

If I remember correctly (I don’t have a copy of the lectures handy), Godard also said in 1978 that he didn’t like Altman’s films. Interestingly, Jacques Rivette more recently said he loved both directors.
An interview with Jost, Godard 80, is an extra on the Every Man for Himself criterion.

The Seul Le Cinema episode of Histoires is dedicated to Cassavetes and Rocha, so that one's genuine, but Eastwood, like Allen, is one I've never been able to tell if Godard appreciates or not.

This quote from the lectures is interesting to me: “In seeing my films again regularly along with other people’s films what I’ve noticed is a fair bit of naïveté and a little stupidity.”

I've always felt his 60s work was a youthful prelude to his mature period, 1980-, in which his best work was done. The critical milieu seems to be coming around to this opinion, but I never knew Godard felt there was some youthful, and naive, missteps in his early period.
accatone wrote:
Fri Aug 09, 2019 11:20 am
Eastwood and Godard
https://m.ina.fr/video/CPB8505083404/cl ... video.html
This seems to implying they had a project in gestation together?

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NWRdr4
Joined: Thu Dec 21, 2017 5:02 pm

Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#1053 Post by NWRdr4 » Fri Aug 09, 2019 5:01 pm

accatone wrote:
Fri Aug 09, 2019 11:20 am
Eastwood and Godard
https://m.ina.fr/video/CPB8505083404/cl ... video.html
This is such a gem, thanks for sharing it!
quim_font wrote:
Fri Aug 09, 2019 2:19 pm
This seems to implying they had a project in gestation together?
Godard considered Eastwood to play Lear. I’d presume that’s what the above video references.

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NWRdr4
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#1054 Post by NWRdr4 » Tue Aug 13, 2019 12:40 pm

Reading through The Future(s) of Film: Three Interviews 2000/01 in which Godard says he "liked quite a lot" Samira Makhmalbaf's The Apple, Jean-Claude Guiguet's The Passengers, and the films of Anne-Marie Miéville. The phrasing is a bit ambiguous to me, but it seems he also liked Shyamalan's The Sixth Sense of all things. Later on, he offers some muted praise for Mendes's American Beauty ("not bad in certain respects").

In case anyone's curious, Godard also expresses "hate" for the films of Joel and Ethan Coen.

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domino harvey
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#1055 Post by domino harvey » Tue Aug 13, 2019 12:47 pm

Godard has said he likes “the two minutes of American Beauty where it becomes a Cassavetes film,” whatever that means

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The Fanciful Norwegian
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#1056 Post by The Fanciful Norwegian » Tue Aug 13, 2019 1:22 pm

NWRdr4 wrote:
Tue Aug 13, 2019 12:40 pm
Reading through The Future(s) of Film: Three Interviews 2000/01 in which Godard says he "liked quite a lot" Samira Makhmalbaf's The Apple...
Godard included this in a nine-film series he guest-programmed in Le Havre in 2004, around the time of Notre musique's release. His other contemporary selections were the already-mentioned The Brown Bunny, Miéville's Après la réconciliation, Moullet's Les naufragés de la D17, Alain Guiraudie's Sunshine for the Poor, Isild Le Basco's Demi-tarif, and Jean-Claude Biette's Saltimbank. He also programmed Mr. Klein and Level Five.

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NWRdr4
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#1057 Post by NWRdr4 » Tue Aug 13, 2019 2:31 pm

domino harvey wrote:
Tue Aug 13, 2019 12:47 pm
Godard has said he likes “the two minutes of American Beauty where it becomes a Cassavetes film,” whatever that means
Yeah, after doing a quick google search I can confirm again that his appreciation for both American Beauty and The Sixth Sense was indeed very limited. Here he criticizes both for being merely "illustrations" of scripts. "The real romantic isn't there," he writes. (My French is limited, so feel free to correct that.)
The Fanciful Norwegian wrote:
Tue Aug 13, 2019 1:22 pm
NWRdr4 wrote:
Tue Aug 13, 2019 12:40 pm
Reading through The Future(s) of Film: Three Interviews 2000/01 in which Godard says he "liked quite a lot" Samira Makhmalbaf's The Apple...
Godard included this in a nine-film series he guest-programmed in Le Havre in 2004, around the time of Notre musique's release. His other contemporary selections were the already-mentioned The Brown Bunny, Miéville's Après la réconciliation, Moullet's Les naufragés de la D17, Alain Guiraudie's Sunshine for the Poor, Isild Le Basco's Demi-tarif, and Jean-Claude Biette's Saltimbank. He also programmed Mr. Klein and Level Five.
Ah, right! Brody mentions this in his book, but he left out the Miéville and Losey films. Thanks!

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domino harvey
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Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#1058 Post by domino harvey » Tue Aug 13, 2019 4:48 pm

NWRdr4 wrote:
Tue Aug 13, 2019 2:31 pm
domino harvey wrote:
Tue Aug 13, 2019 12:47 pm
Godard has said he likes “the two minutes of American Beauty where it becomes a Cassavetes film,” whatever that means
Yeah, after doing a quick google search I can confirm again that his appreciation for both American Beauty and The Sixth Sense was indeed very limited. Here he criticizes both for being merely "illustrations" of scripts. "The real romantic isn't there," he writes. (My French is limited, so feel free to correct that.)
Based on the context of his full quote, I think he may be making a pun with his use of "romanesque," in that these scripts are competent and functional but only explore one side of the story they tell, thus they lack the complexity of a novel (roman). But he could also be using the traditional use of the word to criticize their individual flavor/touch as lacking the romantic notion of the author

quim_font
Joined: Fri May 11, 2018 12:55 pm

Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#1059 Post by quim_font » Tue Aug 13, 2019 6:39 pm

I’d agree he’s using it in the sense of Roman (novel). Relating back to his comments on The Sixth Sense, where he says, “...it would be better to start before, or after, and then go to one side.” I believe he’s talking about how the films are told through a single characters POV, rather than considering the lives and subjectivities of other characters. While of course there are many first-person narratives in literature, the adjective “novelistic” is often used in the complete opposite sense, applied to films where many characters subjectivities are shown or observed in depth.

And, to my knowledge, Godard as never made a “first-person narrative” type film.

Stefan
Joined: Wed Apr 09, 2008 1:33 am

Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#1060 Post by Stefan » Wed Aug 28, 2019 2:18 pm

Godard and Eastwood finally united (and Johnny Hallyday was there too) - Cesars ceremony 1998:

https://www.gettyimages.de/detail/nachr ... /667972504

quim_font
Joined: Fri May 11, 2018 12:55 pm

Re: Jean-Luc Godard

#1061 Post by quim_font » Wed Aug 28, 2019 8:33 pm

Does anyone know if Godard ever expanded upon the text from an episode of Histoires that reads something like: CITIZEN KANE IS NOT A MODEL FOR US TO FOLLOW/ORSON WELLES MAKES FUN OF HISTORY

I know he admires at least some of his films, has he ever discussed his objections? I’ve never been able to pin it down.

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