The Pre-1920s List (Decade Project Vol. 4)

An ongoing survey of the Criterion Forum membership to create lists of the best films of each decade and genre.
Post Reply
Message
Author
User avatar
swo17
Joined: Tue Apr 15, 2008 10:25 am
Location: SLC, UT

The Pre-1920s List (Decade Project Vol. 4)

#1 Post by swo17 » Fri Mar 31, 2017 11:19 pm

VOTING CLOSED. RESULTS CAN BE FOUND HERE.

Welcome to the Lists Project Vol. 4, everyone! If you are reading this sentence, you are eligible to participate in our forum's latest decades list project exploring films from the dawn of cinema, or more precisely, all those released prior to 1920. If you know anyone adventurous enough--on or off the forum--that you think would also enjoy participating, feel free to invite them as well.

Please PM me your list of what you believe are the top 50 films from this period toward the end of the project. I will send confirmation that I have received your list after I have tabulated it. If you haven't heard from me within a day, you should follow up with me to make sure that I received your list. You may feel that you could compile a list of 50 favorite films from this period much earlier than the deadline, but it's still highly recommended that you engage in the discussions here. Don't keep your favorites a secret, and always be open to suggestions from others!


THE RULES

1) Each individual list is to comprise no more or less than 50 films, ranked in your order of preference (with no ties). If you haven't yet seen 50 films from this period that you think are genuinely great (or even if you have), please take advantage of the resources listed below and participate in the ongoing discussions to find films that you can be proud to put on your list.

2) Anyone participating in this project should plan to submit a list by the Round 1 deadline. After this point, I will publish some preliminary results that will not reveal how each film has performed, but will at least make it apparent which films are orphans (i.e. those that have received only one vote, and so receive no points in the tabulation process). During the week that follows (Round 2) all those who are interested in participating further may seek out the orphaned films (or anything else they didn't fit in before the Round 1 deadline) and make revisions to their lists as they see fit, up until the Round 2 deadline. After this point, I will publish both the Round 1 and Round 2 results, so that we can see what, if any, impact the additional round has had. NOTE: This is a trial run of the two-round process, in an attempt to make this whole list project thing a more worthwhile experience for everyone. If it does not appear to be having this effect, I reserve the right to put an end to it abruptly and to erase all record of it ever having existed.

3) Any feature film, serial, documentary, experimental film, or short film released prior to 1920 (so like 1880-1919) is eligible.

4) The date given on IMDb is the relevant date for determining a film's year of release, even when it's clearly wrong (unless a special case is made below). If the film is not on IMDb and you say it was released during this period, I'll take your word for it.

5) In certain cases, it may be appropriate for films that are technically separate to be combined, or for films that are technically combined to be separated. In such cases, you may vote for either a part or the whole, but bear in mind that all votes will be competing against each other (e.g. a vote for Ivan the Terrible Pt. 1 will not count toward the vote for Ivan the Terrible in the final tally). Generally, if multiple films are allowed to be combined for voting purposes, you should probably vote for them that way unless you are strongly opposed to doing so. The most common cases:

• Single-director multi-part films for which each segment was released separately (e.g. Feuillade's serials, Lang's two-part epics) may be considered as a single film. Films included in trilogies may not be combined.

• Variant edits: For films that exist in multiple versions (e.g. Welles' Mr. Arkadin, Rivette's Out 1), all votes that don't specify a "secondary" version will be counted toward the "primary" version.

• Portmanteau films: Each of the individual segments and the film as a whole are all separately eligible.

We may occasionally need to make a special case related to rule 4 or 5. If you are seriously considering including a film on your list that you have a question about in this regard, bring it up in this thread and we'll iron it out. However, I will not make any further exceptions during the last week of the project.

For more details about rules and procedures, please refer here.

Finally, though it is not strictly required, it is recommended that you include titles for films that you discuss in this thread in bold, as it will help the film titles stick out amidst all of the other information that will inevitably pile up in this thread. If you particularly like a film, you might even highlight it in a shiny color. See how much that caught the eye? You're going to be thinking about that for days now.


ELIGIBILITY – REMINDERS / SPECIAL CASES

The following are examples of multi-part films/series that are eligible to be voted for as a single film: Fantômas, Les Vampires, Judex, The Spiders, Who Pays?, Homunculus, Westinghouse Works

In some of these cases, you may feel strongly that you only want to vote for one part of the whole. You can do this, but again, just remember that all votes will be competing against each other (e.g. for all intents and purposes, Fantômas and each of the five individual episodes of Fantômas are six completely separate films). Why you would only vote for a single episode of Fantômas is beyond me--this is just a theoretical example.

Even though the second part of The Spiders came out in 1920, the whole thing is eligible now.

All that currently survives of the serial Homunculus is portions of two episodes. Feel free to vote for all of this surviving footage simply as Homunculus.

The following films may be cited as pre-1920s releases in some places, but not on IMDb, and so are not eligible for this list: The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari


RESOURCES

A list of all films that received votes during our prior pre-1920s project

(Note: I have not gone to the effort of citing all the random collections where these films can be found, but I do know this information for the most part. I figure that people asking about this instead of being able to look it up might prompt some useful discussion.)

IMDb list of eligible films that placed in the forum's first silent era list
IMDb list of eligible films that placed in the forum's second silent era list
IMDb version of our prior pre-1920s list (all compiled by TMDaines)

Past Forum Discussions
Discussion from the Forum's Prior Pre-1920s Project
Defending of Sad Pandas from the Forum's Prior Pre-1920s Project
Discussion from the Forum's Genre List Projects
Discussion from the Forum's Shorts List Project

Guides Within This Thread
Do you feel you have an especially informed opinion about the work during the pre-1920s from a particular director, country, genre, etc.? Many people here would greatly appreciate your taking the time to prepare a guide for navigating through all that's available. (Though they do not necessarily need to be comprehensive.) Guides are especially welcome for extremely prolific directors/movements, or to summarize availability for films (such as shorts) that are often hidden away on releases for other films or only available on the web. Past examples: Director Guide, Country Guide, Genre Guide, DVD Availability Guide

Alice Guy-Blaché (Satori)
Chaplin at Keystone (knives)
Chaplin Mutuals (matrixschmatrix)
Christmas films (knives)
Early Women Filmmakers (Emak-Bakia)
Eruption of Mt. Pelee (Minkin)
Kafka goes to the movies Disc 1 Disc 2 (Tommaso)
Pre-revolutionary Russian films Vols. 1-2 Vols. 3-6 Vols. 7-10 (zedz)

AWAITING FURTHER GUIDES

External Resources

The European Film Gateway, or rather its EFG 1914 project, a cooperation of many European archives for showing films about or made around the time of World War I. Many documentary films of course, but also a lot of fine early feature films you've never heard of, especially from Germany and Italy. And many of these are completely unrelated to the war, so there are adventure films, dramas, comedies etc. to be found here, too. (Tommaso)

The Cineteca del Museo Nazionale del Cinema Vimeo Channel. A very fine collection of early Italian cinema, ranging from documentary/local films to feature films. (Tommaso)

In a celebration of 100 years of Japanese animation, Tokyo's National Museum has posted many early examples of such including a couple of eligible films. There's English subtitles for everything even if the website is in Japanese. (knives)

AWAITING FURTHER SUGGESTIONS

Recommended Reading

AWAITING SUGGESTIONS


THE NEW AND IMPROVED SPOTLIGHT SECTION

Remember that part in the movie Spotlight where all the reporters sat around and said "Hey, you hold your nose and watch this movie that you wouldn't otherwise want to watch and I guess I'll do the same for you"? Oh wait, that's not how it happened at all. No, those reporters went out and put all their heart into their work and gave long important speeches about it. In honor of their garrulousness, this section is now reserved for links to any and all posts on a particular film that are 500 words or longer. Why 500 words? Because when I used to be in the biz, I remember my editor throwing that number around a lot. Sorry folks, but we're living in a post-Spotlight world now, and the old ways just aren't going to cut it anymore.

The Blue Bird (Maurice Tourneur, 1918) (matrixschmatrix)
Cabiria (Giovanni Pastrone, 1914) (matrixschmatrix)
La Cigarette (Germaine Dulac, 1919) (matrixschmatrix)
Girls Taking Time Checks (G.W. Bitzer, 1904) (Minkin)
Hell's Hinges (William Hart, 1916) (matrixschmatrix)
Hypocrites (Lois Weber, 1915) (Emak-Bakia)
Intolerance (D.W. Griffith, 1916) (matrixschmatrix)
J'accuse (Abel Gance, 1919) (matrixschmatrix)
A Man There Was (Victor Sjöström, 1917) matrixschmatrix)
The Matrimaniac (Paul Powell, 1916) (matrixschmatrix)
The Mysterious X (Benjamin Christensen, 1914) (matrixschmatrix)
Nerven (Robert Reinert, 1919) (matrixschmatrix)
The Oyster Princess (Ernst Lubitsch, 1919) (matrixschmatrix)
Die Pest in Florenz (Otto Rippert, 1919) (matrixschmatrix)
The Poor Little Rich Girl (Maurice Tourneur, 1917) (matrixschmatrix)
Præsidenten (Carl Dreyer, 1919) (matrixschmatrix)
The Sinking of the Lusitania (Winsor McCay, 1918) (matrixschmatrix)
Sir Arne's Treasure (Mauritz Stiller, 1919) (matrixschmatrix)
The Spiders (Fritz Lang, 1919-20) (matrixschmatrix)
True Heart Susie (D.W. Griffith, 1919) (matrixschmatrix)
Les Vampires (Louis Feuillade, 1915-16) (matrixschmatrix)
Wagon Tracks (William Hart, 1919) (matrixschmatrix)
The Wishing Ring (Maurice Tourneur, 1914) (matrixschmatrix)


***Please PM me if you have any suggestions for additions to/deletions from this first post.***

User avatar
Tommaso
Joined: Fri May 19, 2006 10:09 am

Re: Pre-1920s List Discussion and Suggestions

#2 Post by Tommaso » Sat Apr 01, 2017 12:32 pm

I'd like to suggest two sites which were not available the last time around and which are great resources for otherwise completely unavailable films (and in mostly very fine quality, too!):

1. The European Film Gateway, or rather its EFG 1914 project, a cooperation of many European archives for showing films about or made around the time of World War I. Many documentary films of course, but also a lot of fine early feature films you've never heard of, especially from Germany and Italy. And many of these are completely unrelated to the war, so there are adventure films, dramas, comedies etc. to be found here, too.

The Cineteca del Museo Nazionale del Cinema Vimeo Channel. A very fine collection of early Italian cinema, ranging from documentary/local films to feature films.

User avatar
matrixschmatrix
Joined: Tue May 25, 2010 11:26 pm

Re: Pre-1920s List Discussion and Suggestions

#3 Post by matrixschmatrix » Sat Apr 01, 2017 3:17 pm

Does anyone have any recommendations for big box sets of things that would yield a lot of contenders? I have the Flicker Alley Méliès set and I've been eyeing Kino's Edison one, but more so than most of the lists I just don't know where to start.
Last edited by matrixschmatrix on Sat Apr 01, 2017 6:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
domino harvey
Dot Com Dom
Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 2:42 pm

Re: Pre-1920s List Discussion and Suggestions

#4 Post by domino harvey » Sat Apr 01, 2017 3:20 pm

The Kino Edison set is ESSENTIAL!

User avatar
Gregory
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2004 4:07 pm

Re: Pre-1920s List Discussion and Suggestions

#5 Post by Gregory » Sat Apr 01, 2017 3:31 pm

Not out till May 9, but I'm really looking forward to Flicker Alley's Early Women Filmmakers: An International Anthology.

During the last round of this era (my personal favorite round of any of the forum's list projects), my greatest discovery was probably Lois Weber's Hypocrites, so even though her work is extremely inconsistent, I look forward to seeing more in the year to come (not only in the FA set but the U.S.-focused Kino one).

Most of the films in the FA set have already been available, but it promises to be an essential silent set and includes the following pre-1920s works:
Alice Guy Blaché
Les Chiens Savants (1902)
Une Histoire Roulante (1906)
La Barricade (1907)
Falling Leaves (1912)
Making an American Citizen (1912)
The Girl in the Armchair (1912)
Lois Weber
Suspense (1913)
Discontent (1916)
Mabel Normand
Mabel’s Strange Predicament (1914)
Madeline Brandeis
The Star Prince (1918)
Germaine Dulac
La Cigarette (1919)

User avatar
swo17
Joined: Tue Apr 15, 2008 10:25 am
Location: SLC, UT

Re: Pre-1920s List Discussion and Suggestions

#6 Post by swo17 » Sat Apr 01, 2017 3:46 pm

matrixschmatrix wrote:Does anyone have any recommendations for big box sets of things that would yeild a lot of contenders? I have the flicker alley melies and I've been eyeing Kino's Edison one, but more so than most of the lists I just don't know where to start.
Early Russian Cinema (expensive DVD-R set from Milestone)
4-disc Japanese Lumiere Brothers set
Unseen Cinema
Several of the Treasures from American Film Archives sets
Flicker Alley's Douglas Fairbanks set
BFI's R.W. Paul disc

User avatar
NABOB OF NOWHERE
Joined: Thu Sep 01, 2005 12:30 pm
Location: Brandywine River

Re: Pre-1920s List Discussion and Suggestions

#7 Post by NABOB OF NOWHERE » Sat Apr 01, 2017 5:21 pm

matrixschmatrix wrote:Does anyone have any recommendations for big box sets of things that would yeild a lot of contenders? I have the flicker alley melies and I've been eyeing Kino's Edison one, but more so than most of the lists I just don't know where to start.
Gaumont : Le Cinéma premier (1907-1916) - Vol 1 & Vol. 2

In the bigger, more expensive and extended Volume 1 Centenary set these are included with a few more between 1916 -1920 including some L'Herbier

User avatar
Ribs
Joined: Fri Jun 13, 2014 1:14 pm

Re: Pre-1920s List Discussion and Suggestions

#8 Post by Ribs » Sat Apr 01, 2017 6:30 pm

PSA: Flicker Alley's got a lot of their box sets available to rent, in HD, for very affordable rates on their Vimeo page. The Fairbanks set for a month for $5 is a steal (this one's not available in HD, but the Melies sets are.) I'll work on getting a more organized list of what they've got available considering it's just kind of a mess on their channel that's a bit hard to sort through.

(Not in this list, but La roue is also available in HD, for the interested!)

User avatar
knives
Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2008 6:49 pm

Re: Pre-1920s List Discussion and Suggestions

#9 Post by knives » Sun Apr 02, 2017 1:56 am

Kino's early Lang set includes one of his films from this period. Also the various Library of Congress sets are pretty essential.

User avatar
matrixschmatrix
Joined: Tue May 25, 2010 11:26 pm

Re: Pre-1920s List Discussion and Suggestions

#10 Post by matrixschmatrix » Sun Apr 02, 2017 2:52 am

I have that Lang set, and actually kicked off my viewings with Harakiri- which is, fine, I guess. It's the most stolidly directed thing I've ever seen from Lang, mostly just kind of planting the camera and letting the scenes play out at length, but it's certainly watchable- though, if you've seen Madame Butterfly, it drags a bit waiting for it to get where you know it's going. The divergences from the opera actually occur mostly at the beginning, where it adds (I think? unless there are elements to Verdi's version I'm forgetting) a bit of derring-do for Perry (here, Olaf) in having him find Butterfly in a forbidden garden and rescue her from a geisha house and so forth- it motivates her devotion to him somewhat, though it makes his utter disinterest in her in the last act seem a bit off. It also adds to the figure of the evil Buddhist priest, who somewhat prefigures Lang's Mabuse figures, an unseen, malevolent hand behind the scenes, destroying out of sexual jealousy- though unfortunately, the horrible, Egghead-esque bald wig on him keeps the actor from giving much of a performance.

Apart from the very obvious whiteness of the leads, the authenticity feels pretty good- the costuming and set design is genuinely fairly convincing, and feels well researched and specific, and while the overall vibe is still obviously one of exotica, the movie is pretty firmly locked into Butterfly's point of view- we're clearly meant to identify with and sympathize with her. That said, Madame Butterfly without music just, kinda, isn't that great a story, and there isn't much flair here to enliven it; overall, it feels like something that is remembered solely because of what Lang went on to do.

User avatar
matrixschmatrix
Joined: Tue May 25, 2010 11:26 pm

Re: Pre-1920s List Discussion and Suggestions

#11 Post by matrixschmatrix » Sun Apr 02, 2017 2:58 am

NABOB OF NOWHERE wrote:Gaumont : Le Cinéma premier (1907-1916) - Vol 1 & Vol. 2

In the bigger, more expensive and extended Volume 1 Centenary set these are included with a few more between 1916 -1920 including some L'Herbier
Are these English friendly? I've seen it suggested elsewhere that they aren't.

User avatar
knives
Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2008 6:49 pm

Re: Pre-1920s List Discussion and Suggestions

#12 Post by knives » Sun Apr 02, 2017 3:06 am

matrixschmatrix wrote:I have that Lang set, and actually kicked off my viewings with Harakiri- which is, fine, I guess. It's the most stolidly directed thing I've ever seen from Lang, mostly just kind of planting the camera and letting the scenes play out at length, but it's certainly watchable- though, if you've seen Madame Butterfly, it drags a bit waiting for it to get where you know it's going. The divergences from the opera actually occur mostly at the beginning, where it adds (I think? unless there are elements to Verdi's version I'm forgetting) a bit of derring-do for Perry (here, Olaf) in having him find Butterfly in a forbidden garden and rescue her from a geisha house and so forth- it motivates her devotion to him somewhat, though it makes his utter disinterest in her in the last act seem a bit off. It also adds to the figure of the evil Buddhist priest, who somewhat prefigures Lang's Mabuse figures, an unseen, malevolent hand behind the scenes, destroying out of sexual jealousy- though unfortunately, the horrible, Egghead-esque bald wig on him keeps the actor from giving much of a performance.

Apart from the very obvious whiteness of the leads, the authenticity feels pretty good- the costuming and set design is genuinely fairly convincing, and feels well researched and specific, and while the overall vibe is still obviously one of exotica, the movie is pretty firmly locked into Butterfly's point of view- we're clearly meant to identify with and sympathize with her. That said, Madame Butterfly without music just, kinda, isn't that great a story, and there isn't much flair here to enliven it; overall, it feels like something that is remembered solely because of what Lang went on to do.
The set is still in my kevyip actually so I haven't seen it. I just figure historically any work from a major director is essential viewing for the project.

User avatar
matrixschmatrix
Joined: Tue May 25, 2010 11:26 pm

Re: Pre-1920s List Discussion and Suggestions

#13 Post by matrixschmatrix » Sun Apr 02, 2017 3:11 am

Well, sure, plus it serves double duty if you plan on doing the Lang auteur list later this year- and I mean, it's a hell of a lot shorter than Die Spinnen, the only other eligible thing of Lang's that's extant.

User avatar
knives
Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2008 6:49 pm

Re: Pre-1920s List Discussion and Suggestions

#14 Post by knives » Sun Apr 02, 2017 3:34 am

Which I should probably try to rewatch since I remember it as good if decidedly lesser than Dr. Mabuse which along with Spies is easily my favorite of the German Lang so not the fairest comparison.

User avatar
theflirtydozen
Joined: Fri Dec 05, 2014 4:21 pm

Re: Pre-1920s List Discussion and Suggestions

#15 Post by theflirtydozen » Sun Apr 02, 2017 11:27 am

swo17 wrote:4-disc Japanese Lumiere Brothers set
How does this compare to this French set? I wasn't aware of the Japanese set and haven't been able to find it in a quick search.

User avatar
NABOB OF NOWHERE
Joined: Thu Sep 01, 2005 12:30 pm
Location: Brandywine River

Re: Pre-1920s List Discussion and Suggestions

#16 Post by NABOB OF NOWHERE » Sun Apr 02, 2017 12:06 pm

matrixschmatrix wrote:
NABOB OF NOWHERE wrote:Gaumont : Le Cinéma premier (1907-1916) - Vol 1 & Vol. 2

In the bigger, more expensive and extended Volume 1 Centenary set these are included with a few more between 1916 -1920 including some L'Herbier
Are these English friendly? I've seen it suggested elsewhere that they aren't.
No unfortunately, there are only occasional flemish options on disc but the booklets(quite lavish) are mono-lingual .
The Kino sets have all the titles it seems with subs but are more expensive.
Last edited by NABOB OF NOWHERE on Sun Apr 02, 2017 12:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
swo17
Joined: Tue Apr 15, 2008 10:25 am
Location: SLC, UT

Re: Pre-1920s List Discussion and Suggestions

#17 Post by swo17 » Sun Apr 02, 2017 12:09 pm

theflirtydozen wrote:
swo17 wrote:4-disc Japanese Lumiere Brothers set
How does this compare to this French set? I wasn't aware of the Japanese set and haven't been able to find it in a quick search.
Japanese set has tons more films. Backchannels have it.

User avatar
knives
Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2008 6:49 pm

Re: Pre-1920s List Discussion and Suggestions

#18 Post by knives » Sun Apr 02, 2017 12:31 pm

Sincere thanks to TMDainesfor the IMDB lists. It helps a lot when it comes to prioritizing.

User avatar
denti alligator
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 9:36 pm
Location: "born in heaven, raised in hell"

Re: Pre-1920s List Discussion and Suggestions

#19 Post by denti alligator » Sun Apr 02, 2017 4:54 pm

swo17 wrote:
theflirtydozen wrote:
swo17 wrote:4-disc Japanese Lumiere Brothers set
How does this compare to this French set? I wasn't aware of the Japanese set and haven't been able to find it in a quick search.
Japanese set has tons more films. Backchannels have it.
I don't see this at KG, or am I overlooking. Where else might I find it?

User avatar
swo17
Joined: Tue Apr 15, 2008 10:25 am
Location: SLC, UT

Re: Pre-1920s List Discussion and Suggestions

#20 Post by swo17 » Sun Apr 02, 2017 5:33 pm

It's there. It's called Les films Lumière. It was apparently only ever released as a laserdisc in Japan.

User avatar
denti alligator
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 9:36 pm
Location: "born in heaven, raised in hell"

Re: Pre-1920s List Discussion and Suggestions

#21 Post by denti alligator » Sun Apr 02, 2017 6:29 pm

Thanks. That was supposed to be a PM. Sorry. You can delete these posts if you like.

User avatar
thirtyframesasecond
Joined: Mon Apr 02, 2007 1:48 pm

Re: Pre-1920s List Discussion and Suggestions

#22 Post by thirtyframesasecond » Mon Apr 03, 2017 5:11 am

Cool, I'm glad we're doing this one again!

We've got access to Kanopy at our uni, which means we can stream loads of silent stuff from Kino Lorber, Flicker Alley, Ruscico, etc.

User avatar
TMDaines
Joined: Wed Nov 11, 2009 1:01 pm
Location: Stretford, Manchester

Re: Pre-1920s List Discussion and Suggestions

#23 Post by TMDaines » Mon Apr 03, 2017 6:43 am

Tommaso wrote:The Cineteca del Museo Nazionale del Cinema Vimeo Channel. A very fine collection of early Italian cinema, ranging from documentary/local films to feature films.
Great find.

User avatar
Tommaso
Joined: Fri May 19, 2006 10:09 am

Re: Pre-1920s List Discussion and Suggestions

#24 Post by Tommaso » Mon Apr 03, 2017 7:19 am

This one was eligible for the all-time list, but I hadn't seen it, so I thought it might be a good way to start the watching for this project.

Frankenstein (J. Searle Dawley, 1910): the very first film version of Mary Shelley's story, and a surprisingly effective one. The sequence in which the creature is created in what looks like some sort of alchemist's oven must have been totally terrifying for the audience of its time, and even today the creature looks like a blueprint for all those zombie movies. Not everything works by modern standards, but the moment when we see only the hand of the creature opening a door shows that the director knew how to create suspense and also used a 'trademark shot' of any creepy movie at a very early time. And finally the scene in front of the mirror,
SpoilerShow
in which it becomes clear that the creature represents basically Frankenstein's dark side,
shows that the director probably understood Mary Shelley's original idea better than some of his colleagues who made other, later film versions. Most likely not on my final list, but still a very good film.

User avatar
TMDaines
Joined: Wed Nov 11, 2009 1:01 pm
Location: Stretford, Manchester

Re: Pre-1920s List Discussion and Suggestions

#25 Post by TMDaines » Mon Apr 03, 2017 8:17 am

I was going to watch that but put it to the back of mind when there were loads of sources, but all were ropey. What's the consensus on the best way to watch it?

Post Reply