2010s List Discussion and Suggestions (Lists Project Vol. 3)

An ongoing survey of the Criterion Forum membership to create lists of the best films of each decade and genre.
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bottled spider
Joined: Thu Nov 26, 2009 2:59 am

Re: 2010-2014 List Discussion and Suggestions

#151 Post by bottled spider » Thu Apr 28, 2016 12:49 pm

I like the way the wide aspect ratio in those screen shots, because they deviate so far from the "natural" 4:3 ratio, give the impression of spying through a horizontal aperture. Like we're hiding inside a mailbox. Or driving a tank. (But seriously, those are beautiful compositions).

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TMDaines
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Re: 2010-2014 List Discussion and Suggestions

#152 Post by TMDaines » Tue May 10, 2016 12:40 pm

I watched a couple of spotlights on a long train journey through Poland this weekend. I loved both Starlet (although I had to make sure no-one else could see the screen at a couple of points) and especially Beyond the Lights.

How Starlet was just willing to be so matter-of-fact in showing the story and the life of an individual with a non-mainstream profession was quite refreshing. It never felt exploitative or done for kicks.

How Gugu Mbatha-Raw did not get any real attention for her performance in Beyond the Lights is beyond me, where she undergoes a complete transformation from Belle. She absolutely carries the film in depicting a star who is carrying the burden of fame, successfully portraying her dual personas of both stage and the woman "beyond the lights".

Unfortunately, neither will be making my top 25, but these are certainly worthy of consideration, especially if you're looking for some lighter watching.

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bottled spider
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Re: 2010-2014 List Discussion and Suggestions

#153 Post by bottled spider » Tue May 10, 2016 6:26 pm

I've been meaning to mention that Rasoulof -- intercepting a recommendation from SWO17 to TMDaines -- is a discovery. Manuscripts Don't Burn is excellent, although sits at my upper limit for disturbing content. I might not be watching many movies for the next few weeks, but I will definitely follow up with The White Meadows and Iron Island when I get the chance.

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knives
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Re: 2010-2014 List Discussion and Suggestions

#154 Post by knives » Tue May 10, 2016 6:38 pm

Yeah, it was a truly amazing film and I liked it a good degree more then The White Meadows to give a slightly contrary opinion. It is obviously a great film, but the thing that impressed me the most is how versatile it shows Rasoulof to be. Beyond some extremely broad thematic elements this has little in common with The White Meadow's Parajanov metaphorical reality trading it for something closer to a small scale, though no less terrifying, Costa-Gavras style thriller. Even the modes of interactions between characters are different in a way that is practically a show off of talent. This is a fairly talkie film with so much information being conveyed through words that leaves it much more nervous and unstable then the almost deterministic silence of The White Meadow. I could keep going on with this compare and contrast bit, but basically this is as much a must see as any film could be. One final thing that I thought was interesting was how openly religious the film was. Not just the concerns of fate facing the main tough, but a lot of the language has religious connotations (i.e. the use of friends in place of heaven in a lot of sayings) and the breaking of religious norms seems like the main mode of characterization (the use of alcohol here is brilliant and so understated it's practically the opposite of Zinnemann's Julia).

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zedz
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Re: 2010-2014 List Discussion and Suggestions

#155 Post by zedz » Wed May 11, 2016 6:20 pm

I also just caught up with Manuscripts Don't Burn, and it is indeed a tremendously impressive film. It's intricately constructed and plays powerfully off familiar cliches:
SpoilerShow
in that the working class protagonist is so thoroughly humanized in all sorts of small character details (money concerns, sick child, etc.) that we sympathetically project doubts and values onto him that are never actually there. In the end, he is a completely ruthless tool of oppression.
I'd personally rank this a couple of notches below Goodbye, which is in many respects less explicit and brutal but more intense, claustrophobic and distressing.

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knives
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Re: 2010-2014 List Discussion and Suggestions

#156 Post by knives » Wed May 11, 2016 9:19 pm

He really is such a fascinating character for how mundane he is. With a simple change of occupation he could easily have been a de Sica protagonist. I'll avoid the obvious cliche and instead express how his final argument as an ideologue (or at least nationalist) really brings home how disturbing it is. Who cares about the motivations of the top (who are never seen, but given the middle we do see probably aren't motivated by those two items) when the bottom is convinced of the propaganda. Actually it is fascinating how the ostensible heroes are very bourgeoisie and intellectual friendly with no lower class face for Rasoulof to build up the sympathies against oppression with that is so typical. I hate to call up this specter, but it brings home a related message to what of the working and lower classes we see in 1984 where any sort of battle for freedom of expression is largely meaningless for most of the population which is a deeply uncomfortable idea.

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zedz
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Re: 2010-2014 List Discussion and Suggestions

#157 Post by zedz » Wed May 11, 2016 10:03 pm

knives wrote:He really is such a fascinating character for how mundane he is. With a simple change of occupation he could easily have been a de Sica protagonist. I'll avoid the obvious cliche and instead express how his final argument as an ideologue (or at least nationalist) really brings home how disturbing it is. Who cares about the motivations of the top (who are never seen, but given the middle we do see probably aren't motivated by those two items) when the bottom is convinced of the propaganda. Actually it is fascinating how the ostensible heroes are very bourgeoisie and intellectual friendly with no lower class face for Rasoulof to build up the sympathies against oppression with that is so typical. I hate to call up this specter, but it brings home a related message to what of the working and lower classes we see in 1984 where any sort of battle for freedom of expression is largely meaningless for most of the population which is a deeply uncomfortable idea.
That's a good observation. It's practically spelt out in the film that the bourgeois bureaucrat calling the shots is primarily motivated by personal ass-covering / settling private scores (since his repeated concern is what the manuscript says about him) far more than any kind of ideological principles, but that kind of corruption and compromise is completely masked over by a system that enjoys such thorough ideological indoctrination at the grass roots level.

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bottled spider
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Re: 2010-2014 List Discussion and Suggestions

#158 Post by bottled spider » Wed May 11, 2016 11:21 pm

I'm glad I brought it up. Superficially, Manuscripts Don't Burn could be described as a political thriller, similar to Munich in as much as it's a fictionalization of real events, dealing with covert operations. But of course it's nothing of the sort. I've been mulling over ever since why this film is so different from anything else I've seen, despite having a mostly linear narrative and a fair amount of conventional action and so on. This conversation has clarified from where the film derives its impact.

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knives
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Re: 2010-2014 List Discussion and Suggestions

#159 Post by knives » Fri May 13, 2016 10:30 pm

Life Without Principles
The opening half hour to this is everything I've wanted out of a To film since first hearing about him. It shows a great deal of intelligence applying relevant social concerns to a story filled with multiple genres. This opening is an effective short tackling predatory lenders by placing us in the seat of one like a noir toned Glengarry Glen Ross that is just funny enough not to be soul destroying horror. To has a wonderful storytelling ability leaving our sweating vulture, cast with a beautiful actress unlike any banker in history, sympathetic even when it is clear what a monster she is. The extended cringe comedy with Mrs. Kun is absolutely perfect. Unfortunately that is just one part of the film which late into things reveals itself to be a Crash style everything's connected movie with a triad and cop plot following hers. They're okay and done with a lot of personality, but everything feels deflated next to Teresa's gut punch storyline. It's hard to blame To though for taking the film down this much more traveled road given how much already the DVD cover is lying, it suggests this is a film with explosions and guns even making up a scene, I suspect this almost great film would have had even less distribution then it got outside of China had it stuck to its best plot.

Of Gods and Men
Anyone familiar with '50s American cinema will be able to guess and work their way through every moment of this film which secures itself in the Christian missionary genre and follows through each element in as pleasant and safe a manner as possible. It's better then some examples of the genre, Stahl's The Keys of the Kingdom, and worse then others, The Left Hand of God, mostly due to a very modern attitude which prevents it from having a political reality. Also thanks to a surprising sensitivity toward the savage heathens these films always have to have for needless conflict it is easy to be fond of the movie though leaving a question of what its purpose is beyond simplistic entertainment. As simplistic entertainment it is fine though and has a fun, light, and engaging pair of performances by Michael Lonsdale and Lambert Wilson who are just fun to hang out with even if they aren't lifting this beyond its dedicated set of cliches.

To Rome with Love
This is a total nonentity of a film, overlong and obvious, but hard to dislike because it is so goofy and comfortable being lightweight nonsense. I could have gone without the Cruz plot and the Baldwin plot really needed a different visual style and probably more time to flesh itself out, but even that doesn't make for worse than a meh experience. Benigni's segment though is exactly the right pitch and length for its absurd little sketch attitude.

Tyrannosaur
This is above average as a piece of British miserablism. I wouldn't really call it a good film though. The lead is too lightly sketched and Eddie Marsen's character is just a lame narrative tool whose unpleasantness is unwarranted and illogical in the context of the movie. Pretty much all of the good points come down to the main actress here who manages to turn her battered woman into an actual character worth being invested in.

Caesar Must Die
What an utterly engrossing film which refuses to be any one thing for too long. It starts off almost like a Frederick Wiseman take on Marat/Sade before shifting into a Kulshev like experiment attached to one of those Carlos Saura theater films before shifting into a few other things in its sparse run time which are completely off the wall yet somewhat familiar. The prison setting and choice of Julius Caesar over other plays suggests a great deal of allegory being appropriate, but the film works better and seems to concerned to just let this cigar be a cigar. Enough defiance comes from a literal reading and the narrative experimentation frankly are nonsense outside of the literal experience of watching prisoners act out Shakespeare. This was my introduction to the brothers Taviani and certainly it has made me compelled to become a fan.

Oki's Movie
This is fairly frustrating. There's a lot of aesthetic novelty here with Hong clearly pushing himself in all aspects of film which interest him, but at the same time outside of the last segment this comes across as fairly disingenuous. The main issue is that instead of honest self examination the self deprecation seems to serve the purpose of leaving the young character with this 'aw shucks woe is me' innocence. That this seem intended to build up the first segment's completely uncritical the death of cinema ballyhooing only sours the experience further. Yet as I say this I also have a little love for the film if just for the last segment which sees Hong exploring, at least to my knowledge, completely new territory as he finally gives one of his female protagonists full control of the movie (as the title suggests this is taken to literal levels). This simple shift in point of view is a real revelation while also serving a great summary of Hong's theoretical approach (her final monologue strikes me as more true to Hong then any of the other talking on cinema in his films perhaps because he doesn't have to cover things up for the character).

Once Upon a Time in Anatolia
I'm surprised at how hilarious this is. It's not Porumboiu funny, but there is a nice strain of humour that relaxes the movie in a good way. Actually, in thinking on it, this film really worked for me because it doesn't fulfill its reputation at all. Instead of a lumbering, po-faced example of slow cinema this is a pretty ordinarily paced procedural that thanks to a real time conceit and a few other theatrical odds and ends succeeds almost as a classical narrative experience. Even the little diversions like the house for coffee fit well conceptually in a way that doesn't make this feel overly experimental in a fussy or self serving manner. Now admittedly that lack of shock also means this doesn't really feel like a great film either, though it builds pretty close to that claim, because the stakes of the psychology and emotion (which seem to be at the heart of the film) aren't that high. This also means that the last half hour feels rather perfunctory as it is separated stylistically and thematically from the rest of the movie in a way that doesn't deepen either end. It's a perfectly okay coda in and of itself, but doesn't work for the whole leaving the sense the film would be better without it.

Carancho
It feels like the only Argentinian films to get distributed in the US have to star Ricardo Darin. There is a genuine absurdity to is since he's really only an average quality actor. Thank goodness though he shares a lot of the story's time with Martina Gusman. There's a really dark and disgusting sequence about forty minutes in that I would have never guessed the film was going to that will probably lose a lot of audience members, but I thought really helped lift this above Trapero's White Elephant. With this scene, fortunately, also comes a switch in point of view from Darin's vulture to Gusman's ambulance driver. Not only is Gusman a better actor then Darin, but her character is far more compelling with a tougher moral plate to eat. Additional good comes from how this is not the neo-noir the DVD was selling it as, but instead is a reasonably good social melodrama. While not necessarily a great film it's probably the best medical drama I've seen capturing an intense sadness and pathetic tone which really suits Darin's face and Gusman's eyes.

The Hunt
This is an awfully silly film and I have to chuckle that something this portentous got so much applause upon arrival. Vinterberg does direct this beautifully with it being genuinely intense and of course Mikkelsen is great (though this is fairly average by his standard), but the house these good qualities are built upon are awfully lazy and silly making even me, no fan of von Trier, look at Dogville in an extremely positive light since it at least committed to the full absurdity of these sorts of themes. The film doesn't go to the absurd heights needed to pull off the idiotic behaviors of the characters (seriously the first thing they teach you as a male teacher of young children is how to avoid these false accusations and all he needed to do was go to Gerthe after the kiss and explain things rather then confront the girl who was no matter what going to take things the wrong way) and is just too dumb to pull off a realistic concern for mob mentality (also frankly this theme wouldn't feel so silly if he was actually guilty; I don't think anyone is going around saying innocent people should be lynched).

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TMDaines
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Re: 2010-2014 List Discussion and Suggestions

#160 Post by TMDaines » Sat May 14, 2016 5:35 pm

The Taviani will feature on my list. Watched a preview of it at the cinema (on a DVD) and the whole cinema was utterly gripped and forgave the mixup that lead to the subpar presentation.

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swo17
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Re: 2010-2014 List Discussion and Suggestions

#161 Post by swo17 » Mon May 16, 2016 2:06 pm

Just a reminder that lists are due two weeks from today, and that's Memorial Day weekend, so some of you might not want to wait until the last minute...

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zedz
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Re: 2010-2014 List Discussion and Suggestions

#162 Post by zedz » Mon May 16, 2016 4:41 pm

swo17 wrote:Just a reminder that lists are due two weeks from today, and that's Memorial Day weekend, so some of you might not want to wait until the last minute...
As I'm going to be overseas on the due date, I've decided to submit early, so I've just hastened my tentative list into an order I can live with.

It's a very strong half-decade, and I had to leave an extra 15 favourites by the wayside. The results also reflect how vital and diverse contemporary cinema is:
- Eight of the directors in my top ten hadn't appeared on any of my previous decade lists (as far as I recall).
- Two of them were there with first features (maybe three, depending on how you define 'feature').
- Fifteen different nationalities are represented, plus three films that don't really have a clear single nationality. Two of those share pretty much the same 'split nationality'.
- the surprise national winner is Portugal, with three films.

I'm very pleased with my number 25, as it's probably the perfect 'last title on the list', since it is simultaneously one of the greatest masterpieces of cinema and utterly void of aesthetic value.

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thirtyframesasecond
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Re: 2010-2014 List Discussion and Suggestions

#163 Post by thirtyframesasecond » Tue May 17, 2016 10:29 am

swo17 wrote:Just a reminder that lists are due two weeks from today, and that's Memorial Day weekend, so some of you might not want to wait until the last minute...
Gosh, I've done terribly with this one. In fact, not sure I've even really watched any new films! I'll be cribbing my top tens from the decade together I think.

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TMDaines
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Re: 2010-2014 List Discussion and Suggestions

#164 Post by TMDaines » Tue May 17, 2016 2:13 pm

So will most people, I'm sure. Although I update my top 10s as I watch more stuff. I've seen close to double the number of films from these last five years than I have from any full decade and I still want to watch much more.

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Re: 2010-2014 List Discussion and Suggestions

#165 Post by mfunk9786 » Tue May 17, 2016 2:25 pm

thirtyframesasecond wrote:
swo17 wrote:Just a reminder that lists are due two weeks from today, and that's Memorial Day weekend, so some of you might not want to wait until the last minute...
Gosh, I've done terribly with this one. In fact, not sure I've even really watched any new films! I'll be cribbing my top tens from the decade together I think.
It's funny - mine turned out way different than the individual year lists and I feel comfortable with the positioning staying the same on those. This just feels like a different thing in a lot of ways.

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swo17
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Re: 2010-2014 List Discussion and Suggestions

#166 Post by swo17 » Tue May 17, 2016 2:50 pm

Four lists in and, interestingly enough, they are all from mods. Seven films in the current top 10 (including all of the top 4) list Germany as one of the countries of production. Because we, like the Germans, are efficient and punctual with a strong work ethic.

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knives
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Re: 2010-2014 List Discussion and Suggestions

#167 Post by knives » Tue May 17, 2016 3:00 pm

I've still got about fifteen I want to get in before the deadline (well really more like 200 but that's no way realistic).

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Tommaso
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Re: 2010-2014 List Discussion and Suggestions

#168 Post by Tommaso » Tue May 17, 2016 3:21 pm

swo17 wrote:Four lists in and, interestingly enough, they are all from mods. Seven films in the current top 10 (including all of the top 4) list Germany as one of the countries of production. Because we, like the Germans, are efficient and punctual with a strong work ethic.
As a German, I think I can safely say that these must all be co-productions, such as Melancholia or Only Lovers Left Alive, as Schipper's "Victoria" or Maren Ade's apparently great new Cannes outing aren't eligible yet (I simply can't think of any 'exclusively' German production from 2010-14 that would be so popular here unless I'm missing something completely). Also, my work ethic is un-Germanly bad, so as usual I'll probably hand in my list rather shortly before the deadline, even though I already have 30 films on my list, which I think are all great...

Oh, and actually my #2 on the list is a German film. But that one was produced in Russia ;)

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knives
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Re: 2010-2014 List Discussion and Suggestions

#169 Post by knives » Tue May 17, 2016 3:27 pm

Cloud Atlas maybe as that's primarily German (same with De Palma's Passion though I doubt anyone is voting for it).

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Re: 2010-2014 List Discussion and Suggestions

#170 Post by colinr0380 » Wed May 18, 2016 4:00 am

No...nobody would do that... 8-[

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TMDaines
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Re: 2010-2014 List Discussion and Suggestions

#171 Post by TMDaines » Wed May 18, 2016 5:56 am

Faust could be one. Phoenix and Barbara could well be there too.

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knives
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Re: 2010-2014 List Discussion and Suggestions

#172 Post by knives » Sun May 22, 2016 2:41 am

Probably penultimate post of this sort.

Farewell, My Queen
Another retelling of Marie Antoinette with the novelty this time being that is told from chambermaid Lea Seydoux's point of view. That's not much of a chiddush with the story being told plainly as a handsome award friendly slave to history whose only strengths lie in its beauty and the acting. The performances aren't challenging for anyone, but Seydoux and Diane Kruger as the queen do swell jobs as they are always engaging and empathetic screen presences (which is impressive on Seydoux's part given that she plays such a passive character Forrest Gumping through this historical event).

Tangerines
This isn't a revolutionary picture, but as a quiet little chamber piece bringing together a number of representatives of the conflict as a hindsight reconciliation it's nice. I am curious about the choice to focus on Estonians given that the film is made by and set in Georgia. Whatever the reason it does add a bit of flavour to the mix and settles on an appropriately hurt mediator for the players.

Road to Nowhere
This film is most interesting for the come back story meta narrative of its production. The main plot and even a lot of the internal narrative trickery lean too hard on being an important art film when a lot of Hellman's exploitation instincts tend to be more interesting as a piece of storytelling. The art house aesthetic though works really well and the film actually could have used more of it. The 'real world' mechanics aren't interesting at all except when they are made to directly connect with the making of the movie (which honestly is more interesting then the 'real world'). Even then though this element isn't terribly well integrated only being perfect at the opening and that montage about an hour in (though in general the film gets better as it moves along). Films like Inception and Inland Empire have dealt with identical thematic meta-narratives much more organically unfortunately. All of that said this is a must see for Shannyn Soossamon's performance which is absolutely amazing and suggests a far greater and multi-faceted film. That she didn't become at least a small scale star out of this is madness. At least it seems, based on IMDB, she's recently started getting steady television work.

The Girl from Nowhere
Image

To be fair though this seems to have replaced some of the pornography Brisseau's films are reputed to have with a DVD collection dick measuring contest. To be even more fair though I literally could make a better film today.

Marshland
This is basically everything True Detective tried to be and didn't quite succeed at. A backwoods thriller that uses elements of the mystery genre and the paranoia developed by new political situations to change the audience's relations to these tropes and cliches in a surprisingly satisfying way.

Laurence Anyways
This is a far better experience then Mommy though it contains all the same vices. The characters in this are such one dimensional, boorish, annoying, brats that whatever it is that Dolan is intending to convey about this relationship (Laurence being trans seems a macguffin) is not worth spending nearly three hours with these people. That extends to the entire construction of the film which is so full of itself trying a new technique even minute in what I assume is an attempt to distract from how shallow this film is. The whole thing is over edited in this annoying and noisy fashion and only settles down to wink at the audience with MTV glee or to make overly obvious emotional points like with the well scripted firing scene. The set design also seems to be of the mind of bringing out the artifice in the real world thing that Demy and Do the Right Thing perform so well. Here though it seems another lazy and trite attempt to appear meaningful or important when it is really ineffectual and shallow like a Zach Braff film. I will say though that Poupaud's performance of Laurence is genuinely great and the idea of his relationship with Clement is refreshing even if I dislike the execution. There's a swagger and a confidence present to him that makes sense of the time and place of his coming out that all the same contains enough self observance to show the weight of his actions on himself. It's an amazingly nuanced performance that needs a better film. Dolan clearly has plenty of heart and empathy which do a lot to make this film occasionally endearing, but he can't get out of his way and just make the genuinely great movie this could have been.

Also, though I haven't seen it, with the criticisms of The Danish Girl in mind this does seem like a more accurate rendering of that relationship and more interesting then had this been an acceptance drama.

Don't Go Breaking My Heart
I'm really glad to have seen this if just because it cements my suspicions of To's strengths as a director. This is far and away the best film I've seen by him perfectly executing the genre even with his ticks for weirdness which come across very organic in this fantasia. Stuff like the talking frog, really Wu's whole character, or a bizarre montage where the asshole dances in his empty office during off hours are utterly bizarre by itself, but functions to accentuate a fairy tale feeling sensibly. I practically want to compare this to Lubitsch, at least in the Shop Around the Corner mode, because it is such an expert handling of the genre. While there are some interesting things in presenting the basic structure of the genre, the film is predicated on the characters deciding it would be more fun to date someone else being the cause of the genre mandated rifts, To's main strength comes in hitting the expected points so well that their familiarity becomes a virtue. He so expertly performs the dance that all of the tension and questions the narrative is supposed to possess feel legitimate and possible. She could get with either of these guys and while which one is real world right for her is obvious which one in that bizarre movie logic she should go with I still don't know. The conclusion leaves me practically speechless due to To turning this into a storytelling masterclass. Also, a bit like Life Without Principles, the film has a little political edge going on in the background with the '08 meltdown explicitly being used to signal the tides of the relationships and even some of plot points. It's not a major element of the film, but it adds to the light comedy something to talk about.

Poetry
Slowly but surely Lee is becoming my favorite Korean director. His MO so far seems clear and strange in a way that could be flat, typical Korean extreme cinema. He takes a genre, murder mystery here and romance in Oasis, and shifts the experience just by having a character be physically or mentally ill. That could be very trite, but Lee does something, I'm not entirely sure what, which makes these films seem like great observance of the core relationships. I wouldn't call them a character study, there's nothing psychological about Oasis for example, so the fullness of character in relation to these seeming ticks doesn't make sense as a typical usage. Maybe that atypical use is what makes the films so compelling. Just as a comparison the plot to this is fairly close to Bong's excellent Mother (though the handicap and POV is on the other end of the relationship here), but that film uses the core relationship and disability to very normal Freudian ends. Here her dementia seems a smaller example of a greater need to develop relationships and forget the bonds that Gd has given her. It remains as in Bong a tool for the plot and characters, but there's no control of it. Lee provides allowance for it if that makes sense.

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Michael Kerpan
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Re: 2010-2014 List Discussion and Suggestions

#173 Post by Michael Kerpan » Mon May 23, 2016 11:18 pm

Glad you liked the To film -- every now and then I run across a clinker by him, but by and large most of the 40+ films I've seen so far have been worthwhile to excellent.

I do not know if LEE Chang-dong is my "favorite" Korean director, but I do think he turns out master works most consistently (if at a very slow pace) of all his compatriots. In some ways, I would rank Poetry as his best film yet (despite the heavy competition from Milyang and Oasis and Peppermint Candy). While I liked Bong's Mother, I feel Poetry is far deeper (and far more thought provoking). (BTW, I would note that the protagonist of Milyang is also quite "troubled" -- even before her tragedy).

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knives
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Re: 2010-2014 List Discussion and Suggestions

#174 Post by knives » Mon May 23, 2016 11:57 pm

Yeah, I think I'm as happy about liking the To as much as it being excellent. Very frustrating that it's only available in America on streaming though. It would be a pretty major change in his reputation but alas.

HONG Sang Soo is probably still my favorite if just by virtue of seeing significantly more of his films, but if LEE's other films maintain the empathy and intelligent use of storytelling these two have I could see that order switching.
Last edited by knives on Tue May 24, 2016 2:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Brian C
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Re: 2010-2014 List Discussion and Suggestions

#175 Post by Brian C » Tue May 24, 2016 5:55 am

knives wrote:Yeah, I think I'm as happy about liking the film as much as it being excellent. Very frustrating that it's only available in America on streaming though. It would be a pretty major change in his reputation but alas.
It's not 100% clear which film you're referring to here, but POETRY is available on Blu and DVD from Kino.

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