90 Kinetta

Discuss DVDs and Blu-rays released by Second Run and the films on them.
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antnield
Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2005 1:59 pm
Location: Cheltenham, England

90 Kinetta

#1 Post by antnield » Tue May 27, 2014 5:45 pm

Second Run have uploaded a trailer to YouTube. The description reads as follows...
The first film by Yorgos Lanthimos, the director of DOGTOOTH and ALPS.

Kinetta. A defunct Greek resort town, inhabited during the off-season by migrant workers.

In this drab off-season resort town, Lanthimos studies the cryptic activities of an inscrutable trio (a policeman, a photographer, and a hotel maid) who barely speak and who pass the time by staging reenactments of murders.

Second Run's DVD of KINETTA will be the first home video release of this extraordinary film anywhere in the world.

Coming September 2014.

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antnield
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Re: Kinetta

#2 Post by antnield » Mon Jun 09, 2014 8:59 am

Amazon pre-order. Release date: September 29th.

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Bikey
Joined: Wed Aug 17, 2005 4:09 am

Re: Kinetta

#3 Post by Bikey » Wed Sep 17, 2014 1:59 pm

Our KINETTA Scalarama screening just got better!
Delighted to confirm that the film will now screen from director Yorgos Lanthimos' own personal 35mm print!

KINETTA 35mm screening + Director Q&A, Sunday 21st at 5:30pm at Tate Modern. Tickets just £5!!
http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-mo ... os-kinetta" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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htshell
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Re: Kinetta

#4 Post by htshell » Mon Sep 29, 2014 7:47 am

Appreciated seeing this on 35mm. Thanks!

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antnield
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Re: Kinetta

#5 Post by antnield » Sun Nov 16, 2014 8:01 am

Image

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Bikey
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Re: Kinetta

#6 Post by Bikey » Mon Jan 05, 2015 2:06 pm

Full DVD specs:

• Presented from a new HD restoration of the film, approved by the director.
• ‘In conversation’ - a new and exclusive filmed interview with director Yorgos Lanthimos filmed at London’s Tate Modern.
• Booklet featuring a new essay on the film by writer and critic Michael Ewins.
• New and improved English subtitle translation.
• World premiere on DVD – released for the first time anywhere on home video

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RossyG
Joined: Sat May 30, 2009 5:50 pm

Re: Kinetta

#7 Post by RossyG » Tue Jan 06, 2015 3:03 am

Bikes, is there any chance of Second Run putting up HD versions of some of their films to buy on iTunes?

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Bikey
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Re: Kinetta

#8 Post by Bikey » Wed Jan 07, 2015 7:33 am

RossyG wrote:Bikes, is there any chance of Second Run putting up HD versions of some of their films to buy on iTunes?
Unlikely in the very near future, RossyG, but will be under discussion. Rest assured that we will inform everyone well before any such moves are made.

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RossyG
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Re: Kinetta

#9 Post by RossyG » Wed Jan 07, 2015 4:06 pm

Thanks for the response. :-)

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Bikey
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Re: Kinetta

#10 Post by Bikey » Thu Jan 08, 2015 10:36 am


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Bikey
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Re: Kinetta

#11 Post by Bikey » Mon Jan 19, 2015 1:11 pm

Full specs and details now up at our website

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Bikey
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Re: Kinetta

#12 Post by Bikey » Fri Jan 23, 2015 4:47 pm

London Evening Standard's Steve Morrissey at MovieSteve

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Bikey
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Re: Kinetta

#13 Post by Bikey » Mon Jan 26, 2015 8:27 am

Fortuitously - but unplanned - Yorgos Lanthimos' KINETTA is out today on the date of the Greek voting seismic result!

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Bikey
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Re: Kinetta

#14 Post by Bikey » Mon Jan 26, 2015 11:15 am

"A lost masterpiece, to be enjoyed by those who crave something more than just one-way entertainment from a film... this unique and fascinating film"
Close Up Film review KINETTA

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Bikey
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Re: Kinetta

#15 Post by Bikey » Tue Jan 27, 2015 9:45 am


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Bikey
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Re: Kinetta

#16 Post by Bikey » Sat Feb 07, 2015 10:56 am

KINETTA reviewed in the latest Sight & Sound

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Bikey
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Re: Kinetta

#17 Post by Bikey » Fri Mar 06, 2015 5:46 am


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Bikey
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Re: Kinetta

#18 Post by Bikey » Fri May 15, 2015 9:15 am

Great to see Yorgos Lanthimos' new film THE LOBSTER getting raves at Cannes! Can't wait to see it.
Variety
Indiewire

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Bikey
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Re: Kinetta

#19 Post by Bikey » Tue May 19, 2015 4:49 am

The Digital Fix review KINETTA

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Bikey
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Re: 90 Kinetta

#20 Post by Bikey » Fri Jan 27, 2017 7:44 am

Congratulations on the (deserved) Academy Award nominations for Yorgos Lanthimos and Efthimis Filippou for their screenplay of THE LOBSTER.
- it all started with KINETTA !

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therewillbeblus
Joined: Tue Dec 22, 2015 3:40 pm

Re: 90 Kinetta

#21 Post by therewillbeblus » Tue May 19, 2020 5:57 pm

Lanthimos’ first solo directing feature makes clear his self-reflexive curiosity in exploring interpersonal human behavior through.. depicting people curiously exploring interpersonal human behavior. What is apparent right out of the gate is Lanthimos’ understanding of this process as a battle between the social and the individual- with each person isolated in their own interests, perceptions, and participation in collaborative acts. I appreciated the bar conversation where a character asks about what is on the videotape, completely individualizing his solipsistic fetish, recalling the paradoxical voyeurism/participation synthesis in the act of watching pornography. This summarizes a lot of what Lanthimos’ core drives want to study, though unfortunately this film barely grazes the surface.

The artificiality of play-acting mimics filmmaking of course, and yet the drives are authentic, desperate and sad, at trying to obtain a comprehensive picture of specific social dynamics- suggesting that either these people don’t know how to behave, or that their lives are so banal they must act out fantasies of ‘what life is not’ for pleasure instead of finding it within their own. Either way it’s a dreary indication. I admire the idea, but he would use it as the base for his most empathic and complex work in Alps a few years later, so people should just see that (somehow underappreciated) film instead.

There is a slight thematic splitting that I enjoyed with the collector character obsessed with cars and even the tapes as objects to fill his own void, while the woman thrives off of the actual experience, and the photographer seems to be the mediator. The first man participates but he often takes on the director role and watches or controls while the woman creates and acts. This line between action through possessing an external object, idea or person, and action through possessing oneself and seizing a moment, is arousing but it’s just left there in a half-realized provocation that is quickly abandoned in favor of capturing the weird. The submissive/dominant BDSM exposition on intentional-injury is also fitting in this wheelhouse, but I just felt like there wasn’t any actual interest in taking these audacious formulations on identity to where we could stew in their intrigue and thus validate the humanity within the controversies. This hesitance to go further ended up feeling like a lack of confidence and betrayed the purpose of the film (again, please see Alps). The ending is pretty good though
SpoilerShow
where the woman, who has previously been the actor and object, takes on the role of ‘watcher’ observing the people playing tennis. Whether this indicates that she is trying a new role out of curiosity, or that her identity is so thin that she can transition this easily, is unclear. An even more disturbing third option is that she was unable to get pleasure out of the identity she took on, and is cast into ungrounded space where she emulates the dominant man's identity before realizing it's not for her and wanders off into the distance, which is a wonderfully dark reading.

I like how the nebulous finale can take on a form of depressing diffusion of personality, directionless nihilism, or adaptable resilience, but I may be giving the film more credit there than it deserves.

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